The Modern Movement 45. At the time of publication of A Passage to India, Forster and Carpenter (Uranian poet, author, and moral reformer, best known for his long poem Towards Democracy, which went through many revised editions) were both friends and neighbors. Forster later wrote an appreciation of Carpenter which appeared in Two Cheers for Democracy (1951). The phrase "this bit of cheek" in the inscription possibly refers to Forster's presumption in venturing into the twin areas of relations between the sexes and between races, which were so much Carpenter's field." /> FORSTER, EDWARD MORGAN. A Passage to India. London: Edward Arnold 1924. <I>8vo, original maroon cloth, extremities rubbed, front inner hinge broken, some foxing, cloth folding case</I>. FIRST EDITION, PRESENTATION COPY TO EDWARD CARPENTER, inscribed by the author on front free endpaper: "E.C. With all good wishes from E.M.F.: this bit of cheek. 7-6-24" (June 4 was publication day). Kirkpatrick A10a; Connolly, <I>The Modern Movement</I> 45. At the time of publication of <I>A Passage to India</I>, Forster and Carpenter (Uranian poet, author, and moral reformer, best known for his long poem <I>Towards Democracy</I>, which went through many revised editions) were both friends and neighbors. Forster later wrote an appreciation of Carpenter which appeared in <I>Two Cheers for Democracy</I> (1951). The phrase "this bit of cheek" in the inscription possibly refers to Forster's presumption in venturing into the twin areas of relations between the sexes and between races, which were so much Carpenter's field. | Christie's