2 pages, 4to, endorsed on verso "not answered because Genl Sherman had gone on to see him." Commanding the Western Department, Fremont writes to Sherman of "rebel troops...[who] were preparing to siege Paducah & attack Cairo. I judge that it was impossible any longer to defer a forward movement...As soon as Genl. Smith is sufficiently reinforced at Paducah...he will have to take and hold Mayfield & Lovelaceville...At the same time Col. Rousseau should bring his force...on boats to Henderson and taking the Henderson & Nashville railroad, occupy Hopkinsville, while Genl. Nelson should go...by railroad to Louisville and from there to Bowling Green...Meantime our force in Mississippi under General Grant would take possession of the Mississipppi Shore opposite Hickman & Columbus." Sherman, second in command to Anderson in Kentucky, advises that the Henderson and Nashville Railroad is not complete, and "we are not prepared to make the active move...until we are better equipped." Fremont, famed for his Western explorations, had been the first Republican Presidential candidate and proved a disappointing field commander. A month prior to this letter he had decreed martial law in Missouri and emancipated all slaves of those in rebellion. President Lincoln, aware of larger political considerations, forcibly revoked Fremont's emancipation proclamation. " /> FREMONT, JOHN C. <I>General</I>. Autograph letter signed ("J.C. Fremont") TO GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, "Head Quarters, Western Department," 8 September 1861, WITH SHERMAN'S INCOMPLETE AUTOGRAPH DRAFT REPLY ON INTEGRAL LEAF. <I>2 pages, 4to, endorsed on verso "not answered because Genl Sherman had gone on to see him."</I> Commanding the Western Department, Fremont writes to Sherman of "rebel troops...[who] were preparing to siege Paducah & attack Cairo. I judge that it was impossible any longer to defer a forward movement...As soon as Genl. Smith is sufficiently reinforced at Paducah...he will have to take and hold Mayfield & Lovelaceville...At the same time Col. Rousseau should bring his force...on boats to Henderson and taking the Henderson & Nashville railroad, occupy Hopkinsville, while Genl. Nelson should go...by railroad to Louisville and from there to Bowling Green...Meantime our force in Mississippi under General Grant would take possession of the Mississipppi Shore opposite Hickman & Columbus." Sherman, second in command to Anderson in Kentucky, advises that the Henderson and Nashville Railroad is not complete, and "we are not prepared to make the active move...until we are better equipped." Fremont, famed for his Western explorations, had been the first Republican Presidential candidate and proved a disappointing field commander. A month prior to this letter he had decreed martial law in Missouri and emancipated all slaves of those in rebellion. President Lincoln, aware of larger political considerations, forcibly revoked Fremont's emancipation proclamation. | Christie's