3 3/8 x 6 in., boldly printed on bright red card stock. Permitting "Miss Lida Miller and friends" to attend Guiteau's sensational and often farcical trial, which began on 14 November. Enormous crowds sought admission to the courtroom, which was filled to standing-room capacity. On 23 January the jury brought in a guilty verdict but it was not until 30 June that Guiteau was finally hanged. TICKETS TO THE GUITEAU TRIAL ARE QUITE RARE. (2) " /> [GARFIELD, James]. GUITEAU, Charles (1840?-1882), <I>assassin of President Garfield</I>. Autograph letter signed to Hon. John D. Townsend, Washington, D.C., 22 November 1881. <I>1 full page, 8vo</I>. A letter--penned in Garfield's typically angular, careless hand--from prison, seeking to hire Townsend to help in his murder trial: "I desire you to assist in the trial of my case & I invite you to meet me...at your earliest convenience. I send this with Mr. Scoville's approbation [a reference to Guiteau's brother-in-law, George Scoville, who was serving, reluctantly, as principal defense attorney]. Please let me hear from you at once." A few days previously, Guiteau had called for a new attorney. Townsend declined the invitation. -- [GUITEAU TRIAL]. Printed ticket of admission to the trial of Charles Guiteau, accomplished and signed by the Prosecutor, George B. Corkhill, District Attorney for D.C., 1881. <I>3 3/8 x 6 in., boldly printed on bright red card stock.</I> Permitting "Miss Lida Miller and friends" to attend Guiteau's sensational and often farcical trial, which began on 14 November. Enormous crowds sought admission to the courtroom, which was filled to standing-room capacity. On 23 January the jury brought in a guilty verdict but it was not until 30 June that Guiteau was finally hanged. TICKETS TO THE GUITEAU TRIAL ARE QUITE RARE. (2) | Christie's