one page, 4to. First Lieutenant Grant formally deposes that, "About the 6th of June, at Tacubaya Mexico, I took to Capt. Gore's room the sum of $1000 in Q[uarte]r M[aste]r Funds, to be locked up in his trunk for safe keeping, my own chest having previously had the lock broken. I also deemed it safer to have Public money in the room of some Officer who did not disburse public funds, because they would be less likely to be suspected of having any considerable amount about them. On the night of the 16th of June 1848...the trunk containing these funds was stolen from the tent of Capt. Gore whilst he and Lt. De Russy...were both sleeping in the tent...." At the bottom of this and the following three documents are official certifications: "Sworn before me" etc., signed by H.D. Waller, Judge Advocate, Genl. Court Mar[tial]"--GORE, JOHN H., Captain. Document signed, TEXT IN THE HAND OF GRANT, Jalapa, 26 June 1848, 2 pages, 4to, deposing the circumstances of the money's being placed in his trunk "for its conveyance on the march which we were preparing to commence," swearing that he "had it carefully guarded during the day, ad placed in my tent during the night," but that thieves "cut open the corner of my tent at which the trunk was placed...took it out and carried it off," to a nearby mill-race, where it was broken open and looted--DE RUSSY J, Lieutenant. Document signed, TEXT IN THE HAND OF GRANT, Jalapa, 27 June 1848, one page, 4to, confirming ahtt "whilst encamped in the vicinity of Puebla the trunk...was stolen from the tent...."--JONES, D.L.F., Lieutenant. Document signed, TEXT IN THE HAND OF GRANT, Jalapa, 26 June 1848, one page, 4to, confirming that the bag contained $1,000 when he helped count it--GALLAHER, JOHN S., Auditor, Treasury Dept. Autograph letter signed to Secretary of the Treasury Thomas Corwin, [Washington, D.C.], 12 February 1852, 2 pages, 4to, detailing Grant's accounts with the government and stating that "no mention has been made by [Grant] of having lost any money..." and that the funds are still outstanding--CORWIN, THOMAS, Secretary of Treasury. Letter signed to Representative O.S. Seymour, "Committee of Claims," Washington, D.C., 16 February 1852, 1 page, 4to, insisting that when public funds are lost by a disbursing officer, "No credit can be given...unless authorized by Act of Congress...." Manuscripts of Grant from this early date are very rare. A fascinating archive recording a little-known incident in the military career of Grant, 26 years of age at the time. It appears that the affair of the stolen $1,000 in U.S. funds remained unresolved when Grant left the army, and was still on the books when he was recommissioned as a Colonel of Volunteers (not long after Fort Sumter was fired upon). Finally, in June 1862, after Grant's signal victories at Forts Donelson and Henry, Congress acted to cancel the 14-year-old debt. A detailed description of the archive is present. (6) " /> GRANT, ULYSSES S., <I>President</I>. A small archive of four depositions and two letters, THE DEPOSITIONS ENTIRELY WRITTEN BY GRANT, relating to the theft of $1,000 of government funds in Grant's care during the War with Mexico; including: GRANT, U.S. Autograph document signed ("U.S. Grant, 1st Lt., 4th Inf."), Camp near Jalapa, Mexico, 27 June 1848, <I>one page, 4to.</I> First Lieutenant Grant formally deposes that, "About the 6th of June, at Tacubaya Mexico, I took to Capt. Gore's room the sum of $1000 in Q[uarte]r M[aste]r Funds, to be locked up in his trunk for safe keeping, my own chest having previously had the lock broken. I also deemed it safer to have Public money in the room of some Officer who did not disburse public funds, because they would be less likely to be suspected of having any considerable amount about them. On the night of the 16th of June 1848...the trunk containing these funds was stolen from the tent of Capt. Gore whilst he and Lt. De Russy...were both sleeping in the tent...." At the bottom of this and the following three documents are official certifications: "Sworn before me" etc., signed by H.D. Waller, Judge Advocate, Genl. Court Mar[tial]"--GORE, JOHN H., <I>Captain</I>. Document signed, TEXT IN THE HAND OF GRANT, Jalapa, 26 June 1848, <I>2 pages, 4to,</I> deposing the circumstances of the money's being placed in his trunk "for its conveyance on the march which we were preparing to commence," swearing that he "had it carefully guarded during the day, ad placed in my tent during the night," but that thieves "cut open the corner of my tent at which the trunk was placed...took it out and carried it off," to a nearby mill-race, where it was broken open and looted--<I>DE RUSSY J, <I>Lieutenant</I>. Document signed, TEXT IN THE HAND OF GRANT, Jalapa, 27 June 1848, <I>one page, 4to</I>, confirming ahtt "whilst encamped in the vicinity of Puebla the trunk...was stolen from the tent...."--JONES, D.L.F., <I>Lieutenant</I>. Document signed, TEXT IN THE HAND OF GRANT, Jalapa, 26 June 1848, <I>one page, 4to</I>, confirming that the bag contained $1,000 when he helped count it--GALLAHER, JOHN S., <I>Auditor, Treasury Dept.</I> Autograph letter signed to Secretary of the Treasury Thomas Corwin, [Washington, D.C.], 12 February 1852, <I>2 pages, 4to,</I> detailing Grant's accounts with the government and stating that "no mention has been made by [Grant] of having lost any money..." and that the funds are still outstanding--CORWIN, THOMAS, <I>Secretary of Treasury.</I> Letter signed to Representative O.S. Seymour, "Committee of Claims," Washington, D.C., 16 February 1852, <I>1 page, 4to</I>, insisting that when public funds are lost by a disbursing officer, "No credit can be given...unless authorized by Act of Congress...." Manuscripts of Grant from this early date are very rare. A fascinating archive recording a little-known incident in the military career of Grant, 26 years of age at the time. It appears that the affair of the stolen $1,000 in U.S. funds remained unresolved when Grant left the army, and was still on the books when he was recommissioned as a Colonel of Volunteers (not long after Fort Sumter was fired upon). Finally, in June 1862, after Grant's signal victories at Forts Donelson and Henry, Congress acted to cancel the 14-year-old debt. A detailed description of the archive is present. (6) | Christie's