, SIGNED BY HEMINGWAY in pencil at top of front cover: "E Hemingway Finca Vigia." [With:] "The Old Man and the Sea. Notes Regarding Changes in Script. March 30, 1956," 2 typed pages, 4to, a little frayed and foxed, with about 50 WORDS OF PENCILLED ANNOTATIONS BY HEMINGWAY (initialed in two places) and with a few notes (one initialed) in red ink by Fred Zinnemann (the director at the time); and five related ephemeral items from the producer Leland Hayward's office (or Warner Bros., etc.) to Hemingway, 23 June-23 July 1957. "NO MOVIE WITH A RUBBER FISH EVER MADE A GODDAMN DIME" -- HEMINGWAY Hemingway's working notes, made in Cuba at the end of March (and/or early April) 1956, as principal photography for the movie was getting under way, consist of 31 separate annotations (14 of them initialed) totalling 220 words in heavy pencil in his hand on 22 of the script's pages. In addition, there are 15 pencilled markings (deletions, question marks, etc.) by him. Throughout the script, in another hand in blue ink, are the corresponding page numbers of the book The Old Man and the Sea. On a few pages in pencilled block letters someone has translated various film terms into Spanish. Hemingway's annotations, ranging from a one-word note to a 57-word discussion of a story issue (p. 83A), involve dialogue revisions, corrections of factual points in the fishing action, and various critical comments. The long note mentioned above occurs near the end of the script as the Old Man and the Boy are talking: "See page 138 of book -- Old Man: 'I know how to care for them [his hands]. In the night I spat something strange and felt something in my chest was broken.' Boy: 'Get that well too.' (and what follows). (You lose your story here and there is no previous reference in the script to the damage to his chest. EH)." Later, revised versions of Viertel's script were done; one of 150 mimeographed pages marked "Revised Continuity April 25, 1957" was in the "Marcia and John Goin Ernest Hemingway Collection" catalogue (Santa Barbara: Joseph the Provider, 1992), item 514. Although Hollywood filmed several of Hemingway's novels and stories, the movie of The Old Man and the Sea (his 1952 short novel which won him the Nobel Prize) was the only one in which he was involved. Hemingway himself picked Peter Viertel to write it (he also did the screenplay for The Sun Also Rises) and actively assisted with the script and the filming from June 1955 through May 1956. During this period Hemingway, acting as technical adviser, immersed himself in the project, which starred Spencer Tracy as the heroic fisherman Santiago. The producer Leland Hayward and the director Fred Zinnemann arrived in Cuba in March 1956 to begin principal photography; Hemingway's notes on his copy of the script date from this period. Despite Hemingway's expertise in fishing the Gulf Stream, the film crew was unable to get footage of large, leaping marlin needed for the movie. A month's fishing and filming off the coast of Peru in April-May 1956 was also unsuccessful. By this point Zinnemann had left the film (to be replaced by John Sturges) and "the production...was soon ordered back to Burbank and finished in a tank with back-projection plates of the Gulf Stream that gave the movie an air of unreality...in the end Hayward bought the sixteen-millimeter footage he had seen at an earlier date, and it was included, not very satisfactorily, in the final version" (Peter Viertel, Dangerous Friends, New York: Doubleday, 1992, p. 279). Early in the project Hemingway warned Hayward about cutting corners by not having realistic fishing action. "For the sequence in which Santiago tries to fight off the sharks that ultimately devour his marlin, a rubber fish, baited with meat, was used, having been built by the special effects department in disregard of Papa's warning that 'no movie with a rubber fish ever made a goddamn dime.'" (Viertel, pp. 279-280). The Old Man and the Sea was released in October 1958 and proved to be an artistic and commercial flop. " /> HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Mimeographed screenplay by Peter Viertel for the film <I>The Old Man and the Sea</I>, HEMINGWAY'S COPY WITH HIS EXTENSIVE ANNOTATIONS. N.p. [nearly all the screenplay pages dated 26 March 1956]. <I>112 mimeographed pages, 4to, text on rectos only (9 of the pages from an earlier draft and each dated 4 November 1955), some light foxing, bound in green wrappers with two brass fasteners, front cover printed: "Warner Bros. Pictures Inc. Leland Hayward Productions 'The Oldman [sic] and the Sea,'" covers slightly soiled and worn</I>, SIGNED BY HEMINGWAY <I>in pencil at top of front cover: "E Hemingway Finca Vigia</I>." [<I>With</I>:] "<I>The Old Man and the Sea</I>. Notes Regarding Changes in Script. March 30, 1956," <I>2 typed pages, 4to, a little frayed and foxed, with about</I> 50 WORDS OF PENCILLED ANNOTATIONS BY HEMINGWAY (initialed in two places) and with a few notes (one initialed) in red ink by Fred Zinnemann (the director at the time); and five related ephemeral items from the producer Leland Hayward's office (or Warner Bros., etc.) to Hemingway, 23 June-23 July 1957. "NO MOVIE WITH A RUBBER FISH EVER MADE A GODDAMN DIME" -- HEMINGWAY Hemingway's working notes, made in Cuba at the end of March (and/or early April) 1956, as principal photography for the movie was getting under way, consist of 31 separate annotations (14 of them initialed) totalling 220 words in heavy pencil in his hand on 22 of the script's pages. In addition, there are 15 pencilled markings (deletions, question marks, etc.) by him. Throughout the script, in another hand in blue ink, are the corresponding page numbers of the book <I>The Old Man and the Sea</I>. On a few pages in pencilled block letters someone has translated various film terms into Spanish. Hemingway's annotations, ranging from a one-word note to a 57-word discussion of a story issue (p. 83A), involve dialogue revisions, corrections of factual points in the fishing action, and various critical comments. The long note mentioned above occurs near the end of the script as the Old Man and the Boy are talking: "See page 138 of book -- Old Man: 'I know how to care for them [his hands]. In the night I spat something strange and felt something in my chest was broken.' Boy: 'Get that well too.' (and what follows). (You lose your story here and there is no previous reference in the script to the damage to his chest. EH)." Later, revised versions of Viertel's script were done; one of 150 mimeographed pages marked "Revised Continuity April 25, 1957" was in the "Marcia and John Goin Ernest Hemingway Collection" catalogue (Santa Barbara: Joseph the Provider, 1992), item 514. Although Hollywood filmed several of Hemingway's novels and stories, the movie of <I>The Old Man and the Sea</I> (his 1952 short novel which won him the Nobel Prize) was the only one in which he was involved. Hemingway himself picked Peter Viertel to write it (he also did the screenplay for <I>The Sun Also Rises</I>) and actively assisted with the script and the filming from June 1955 through May 1956. During this period Hemingway, acting as technical adviser, immersed himself in the project, which starred Spencer Tracy as the heroic fisherman Santiago. The producer Leland Hayward and the director Fred Zinnemann arrived in Cuba in March 1956 to begin principal photography; Hemingway's notes on his copy of the script date from this period. Despite Hemingway's expertise in fishing the Gulf Stream, the film crew was unable to get footage of large, leaping marlin needed for the movie. A month's fishing and filming off the coast of Peru in April-May 1956 was also unsuccessful. By this point Zinnemann had left the film (to be replaced by John Sturges) and "the production...was soon ordered back to Burbank and finished in a tank with back-projection plates of the Gulf Stream that gave the movie an air of unreality...in the end Hayward bought the sixteen-millimeter footage he had seen at an earlier date, and it was included, not very satisfactorily, in the final version" (Peter Viertel, <I>Dangerous Friends</I>, New York: Doubleday, 1992, p. 279). Early in the project Hemingway warned Hayward about cutting corners by not having realistic fishing action. "For the sequence in which Santiago tries to fight off the sharks that ultimately devour his marlin, a rubber fish, baited with meat, was used, having been built by the special effects department in disregard of Papa's warning that 'no movie with a rubber fish ever made a goddamn dime.'" (Viertel, pp. 279-280). <I>The Old Man and the Sea</I> was released in October 1958 and proved to be an artistic and commercial flop. | Christie's