6 pages, 8vo. HOOKER'S OPINION OF PRESIDENT GRANT. A remarkable, lengthy letter, congratulating Perry on the elections, but asserting that: "...I am no party man, in the sense in which it is now used, as being paramount to the good of the country....My idea of government is that that is the best one, which has the fewest officers. Morally and physically, the evil of evils of the present day is the desire for office....I am sorry to see that our President is pursuing the course that he does, but I always predicted that he would leave office in worse order than [Andrew] Johnson did. Indeed there is no more cause for his impeachment, than there ever was for the impeachment of his predecessor....[George S.] Boutwell [Secretary of Treasury] is to be the next victim. It is said he is becoming to prominent to suit Grant...as the head of the Treasury Dept....We have had no President since [John A. Rawlins, Secretary of War] died. I understand that [Simon] Cameron is at the head now, and he was not considered honest enough in Lincoln's time....I know, I went to him directly on arriving from California, to inform him that there were several regiments in that state [which]....wanted transportation. [He] Informed me that it would cost too much to bring regiments from California, when, at the same time he was bringing regiments from Harrisburg over his own Railroad at a greater cost than...to bring them from California....Now he is Grant's chief adviser. But we have an automaton at the head of the government. I did give Grant credit for Vicksburg but I see by the Sun this morning that Wilson was the author of that plan....I do hope that our next President may possess ordinary information and at least have the instincts of a gentleman...." " /> HOOKER, JOSEPH, <I>Major General</I>. Autograph letter signed ("J. Hooker") Maj. Genl.") to Aaron F. Perry of Cincinnati; Brevoort House, New York, 21 October 1870. <I>6 pages, 8vo</I>. HOOKER'S OPINION OF PRESIDENT GRANT. A remarkable, lengthy letter, congratulating Perry on the elections, but asserting that: "...I am no party man, in the sense in which it is now used, as being paramount to the good of the country....My idea of government is that that is the best one, which has the fewest officers. Morally and physically, the evil of evils of the present day is the desire for office....I am sorry to see that our President is pursuing the course that he does, but I always predicted that he would leave office in worse order than [Andrew] Johnson did. Indeed there is no more cause for his impeachment, than there ever was for the impeachment of his predecessor....[George S.] Boutwell [Secretary of Treasury] is to be the next victim. It is said he is becoming to prominent to suit Grant...as the head of the Treasury Dept....We have had no President since [John A. Rawlins, Secretary of War] died. I understand that [Simon] Cameron is at the head now, and he was not considered honest enough in Lincoln's time....I know, I went to him directly on arriving from California, to inform him that there were several regiments in that state [which]....wanted transportation. [He] Informed me that it would cost too much to bring regiments from California, when, at the same time he was bringing regiments from Harrisburg <I>over his own Railroad</I> at a greater cost than...to bring them from California....Now he is Grant's chief adviser. But we have an automaton at the head of the government. I did give Grant credit for Vicksburg but I see by the Sun this morning that Wilson was the author of that plan....I do hope that our next President may possess ordinary information and at least have the instincts of a gentleman...." | Christie's