5 full pages, 8vo. HOWARD DESCRIBES THE DEATH OF GENERAL JAMES B. MCPHERSON. Apparently an excerpt from his memoirs, detailing McPherson's tragic death at the Battle of Atlanta. When the "loud roar of Artillery and the angry sounds of musketry...came to Sherman and McPherson...McPherson mounted & galloped off toward the firing...went at once to Dodge; saw matters going well there; sent off aides & orderlies with dispatches, till he had but one or two men left with him. He then rode forward...through the thick forest interval. Cheatham's Div. was just approaching. The call was made 'surrender,' but McPherson probably without a thought save to escape from such a trap turned his horse toward his command. He was instantly slain & fell from his horse...While the battle raged, McPherson's body was brought to Sherman." Howard concludes: "His death occasioned a profound sense of loss...How valuable, how precious the country to us all who have paid for its preservation such a price!" James Birdseye McPherson (1828-1864) had achieved remarkable success during his brief career. A first lieutenant of engineers in August 1861, a year later he had been promoted to Major General of volunteers, in August 1863 he was a Brigadier in the regular army, and by the time of his death had assumed command of Sherman's Army of the Tennessee. One biographer writes: "Sherman's tears rolled through his beard and down on the floor" when McPherson's body was brought to him. " /> HOWARD, OLIVER OTIS, <I>Major General</I>. Autograph letter signed ("O.O. Howard") to E.T. Lawsing, Fort Mason [San Francisco], 22 August 1888? <I>5 full pages, 8vo.</I> HOWARD DESCRIBES THE DEATH OF GENERAL JAMES B. MCPHERSON. Apparently an excerpt from his memoirs, detailing McPherson's tragic death at the Battle of Atlanta. When the "loud roar of Artillery and the angry sounds of musketry...came to Sherman and McPherson...McPherson mounted & galloped off toward the firing...went at once to Dodge; saw matters going well there; sent off aides & orderlies with dispatches, till he had but one or two men left with him. He then rode forward...through the thick forest interval. Cheatham's Div. was just approaching. The call was made 'surrender,' but McPherson probably without a thought save to escape from such a trap turned his horse toward his command. He was instantly slain & fell from his horse...While the battle raged, McPherson's body was brought to Sherman." Howard concludes: "His death occasioned a profound sense of loss...How valuable, how precious the country to us all who have paid for its preservation such a price!" James Birdseye McPherson (1828-1864) had achieved remarkable success during his brief career. A first lieutenant of engineers in August 1861, a year later he had been promoted to Major General of volunteers, in August 1863 he was a Brigadier in the regular army, and by the time of his death had assumed command of Sherman's Army of the Tennessee. One biographer writes: "Sherman's tears rolled through his beard and down on the floor" when McPherson's body was brought to him. | Christie's