1 page, 4to, on elaborate Zionist Congress letterhead, upper right corner missing, browning, in German. HERZL: SPIRITUAL FATHER OF ISRAEL. A brief letter written during the tremendously important period when Theodor Herzl was devoted to the organization of an international Zionist movement through the first Zionist Congress. As a witness to the famous Dreyfus Affair, the accusation of a Jewish officer in the French Army for treason based upon obvious anti-semitic feelings, Herzl realized that European Jews needed a homeland where they could find shelter from bias. In his 1896 book The Jewish State, he argued that acceptance of the Jews would only come by recognition through nationhood. The popularity of Herzl's ideas allowed him to convene the First Zionist Congress in Basle, Switzerland in 1897, and six more conferences before 1902. Here he writes to Theodor Zlocisti in Berlin from the Zionist Congress office; "The affair of this correspondance is naturally well known to me. The Action Committee has issued an approriate explanation which is completely in keeping with the facts, and it is not necessary to refer to the matter any further." -- HERZL. Printed circular letter signed ("Herzl"), Vienna, 18 November 1901. 1 page, 4to, upper right corner missing, in German. In a circular letter, Herzl discusses a difference of opinion with Dr. Bernstein-Kohan concerning conference protocols. Their disagreement was fanned by the decision to send an earlier circular which had not been approved by the entire congress. (2) " /> [ISRAEL]. HERZL, Theodor (1860-1904), <I>Hungarian Zionist Leader</I>. Typed letter signed ("Herzl") to Theodor Zlocisti, Vienna, 14 January 1901. <I>1 page, 4to, on elaborate Zionist Congress letterhead, upper right corner missing, browning</I>, in German. HERZL: SPIRITUAL FATHER OF ISRAEL. A brief letter written during the tremendously important period when Theodor Herzl was devoted to the organization of an international Zionist movement through the first Zionist Congress. As a witness to the famous Dreyfus Affair, the accusation of a Jewish officer in the French Army for treason based upon obvious anti-semitic feelings, Herzl realized that European Jews needed a homeland where they could find shelter from bias. In his 1896 book <I>The Jewish State</I>, he argued that acceptance of the Jews would only come by recognition through nationhood. The popularity of Herzl's ideas allowed him to convene the First Zionist Congress in Basle, Switzerland in 1897, and six more conferences before 1902. Here he writes to Theodor Zlocisti in Berlin from the Zionist Congress office; "The affair of this correspondance is naturally well known to me. The Action Committee has issued an approriate explanation which is completely in keeping with the facts, and it is not necessary to refer to the matter any further." -- HERZL. Printed circular letter signed ("Herzl"), Vienna, 18 November 1901. <I>1 page, 4to, upper right corner missing</I>, in German. In a circular letter, Herzl discusses a difference of opinion with Dr. Bernstein-Kohan concerning conference protocols. Their disagreement was fanned by the decision to send an earlier circular which had not been approved by the entire congress. (2) | Christie's