Together 6 pages, 8vo-4to, one letter crudely repaired with tape, hole affecting text, second letter trimmed at left margin affecting few letters text. "THOSE MISERABLE YANKEES WILL NOT LET US ALONE..." Robert E. Lee's invalid wife writes from her sick bed, where she has been visited by Jubal Early. "Genl. Early has been here...& is so much more courteous & pleasant than I expected from what I had heard of him." Referring to a student at Washington College, where Robert E. Lee was President, she writes: "Martin Banks...dresses so nicely & is such a beau & the Genl says he is a very good student too." She concludes with reminiscences of the past: "The dear old Confederate times with all their cares & anxieties are better than what we have now for those miserable yankees will not let us alone, their enmity & revenge are not likely to make us forget them & all our wrongs." In the second letter, Lee discusses a canal boat, which sank at Lynchburg and was carrying some pictures belonging to her: "...It was quite a pity when they had all been so nicely repaired." (2) " /> LEE, MARY CUSTIS. Two autograph letters signed ("Mary Custis Lee") to unknown correspondents, Lexington, 4 April 1869 & 4 September 1879. <I>Together 6 pages, 8vo-4to, one letter crudely repaired with tape, hole affecting text, second letter trimmed at left margin affecting few letters text.</I> "THOSE MISERABLE YANKEES WILL NOT LET US ALONE..." Robert E. Lee's invalid wife writes from her sick bed, where she has been visited by Jubal Early. "Genl. Early has been here...& is so much more courteous & pleasant than I expected from what I had heard of him." Referring to a student at Washington College, where Robert E. Lee was President, she writes: "Martin Banks...dresses so nicely & is such a beau & the Genl says he is a very good student too." She concludes with reminiscences of the past: "The dear old Confederate times with all their cares & anxieties are better than what we have now for those miserable yankees will not let us alone, their enmity & revenge are not likely to make us forget them & all our wrongs." In the second letter, Lee discusses a canal boat, which sank at Lynchburg and was carrying some pictures belonging to her: "...It was quite a pity when they had all been so nicely repaired." (2) | Christie's