on a printed sheet identical to the preceding, 1 page, 8vo. In a very bold hand, President Roosevelt has written: "When our civilization of the 20 th century becomes as remote as the days of Greece and of Rome are to us, and when our buildings and 'improvements' have crumbled to dust - Lincoln's words will still ring out and serve as inspiration to men and women throughout the world." Eleanor Roosevelt has penned: "This masterpiece of Lincoln's needs no comment to add to its glory, but it will always stir the heart of America." -- HARDING, Warren G. (1865-1923), President. Autograph endorsement signed ("Warren G. Harding"), n.p., n.d. [1940s?]. 1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, with a red initial letter "F". Harding has written: "For time and place and existing conditions, the address is the most notable and most enduring of public addresses of all time." -- WILSON, Woodrow (1856-1929), President. Autograph endorsement signed ("Woodrow Wilson"), n.p., n.d. [1920s?]. 1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink across the lower portion of a sheet with the complete typewritten text of the Gettysburg Address. Wilson has penned in a bold hand: "An incomparable example of sincere eloquence." -- HOOVER, Herbert (1874-1964), President. Autograph endorsement signed ("Herbert Hoover"), n.p., n.d. 1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, in two columns, with a small portrait of Lincoln at lower bottom. In an extremely bold hand, Hoover prescribes: "This should be read every morning by every American official." -- EISENHOWER, Dwight David (1890-1969), President. Autograph endorsement signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower"), n.p., 15 August 1952. 1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, in two columns, with a small portrait of Lincoln at lower bottom. Eisenhower writes: "To these immortal words no man could add." -- TRUMAN, Harry S. (1884-1972), President. Autograph endorsement signed ("Harry Truman"), n.p., October 1955. 1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, in two columns, with a small portrait of Lincoln at lower bottom. Truman simply writes, in a very large hand: "Good luck Harry Truman." Together 7 items. " /> [LINCOLN, Abraham, GETTYSBURG ADDRESS.] A collection of statements by presidents on the significance of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. ROOSEVELT, Franklin Delano, <I>President.</I> Autograph manuscript signed, n.p., n.d. [1940s?]. <I>1 page, 8vo, penned in bold ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, in two columns, and a small portrait of Lincoln at left bottom.</I> - ROOSEVELT, Eleanor, First Lady. Autograph manuscript signed ("Eleanor Roosevelt"), <I>on a printed sheet identical to the preceding, 1 page, 8vo.</I> In a very bold hand, President Roosevelt has written: "When our civilization of the 20 th century becomes as remote as the days of Greece and of Rome are to us, and when our buildings and 'improvements' have crumbled to dust - Lincoln's words will still ring out and serve as inspiration to men and women throughout the world." Eleanor Roosevelt has penned: "This masterpiece of Lincoln's needs no comment to add to its glory, but it will always stir the heart of America." -- HARDING, Warren G. (1865-1923), <I>President.</I> Autograph endorsement signed ("Warren G. Harding"), n.p., n.d. [1940s?]. <I>1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, with a red initial letter "F".</I> Harding has written: "For time and place and existing conditions, the address is the most notable and most enduring of public addresses of all time." -- WILSON, Woodrow (1856-1929), <I>President.</I> Autograph endorsement signed ("Woodrow Wilson"), n.p., n.d. [1920s?]. <I>1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink across the lower portion of a sheet with the complete typewritten text of the Gettysburg Address.</I> Wilson has penned in a bold hand: "An incomparable example of sincere eloquence." -- HOOVER, Herbert (1874-1964), <I>President.</I> Autograph endorsement signed ("Herbert Hoover"), n.p., n.d. <I>1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, in two columns, with a small portrait of Lincoln at lower bottom.</I> In an extremely bold hand, Hoover prescribes: "This should be read every morning by every American official." -- EISENHOWER, Dwight David (1890-1969), <I>President.</I> Autograph endorsement signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower"), n.p., 15 August 1952. <I>1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, in two columns, with a small portrait of Lincoln at lower bottom.</I> Eisenhower writes: "To these immortal words no man could add." -- TRUMAN, Harry S. (1884-1972), <I>President.</I> Autograph endorsement signed ("Harry Truman"), n.p., October 1955. <I>1 page, large 8vo, penned in ink in the lower portion of a sheet with the complete printed text of the Gettysburg Address, in two columns, with a small portrait of Lincoln at lower bottom.</I> Truman simply writes, in a very large hand: "Good luck Harry Truman." <I>Together 7 items.</I> | Christie's