Provenance: Couriol fils, of the Eure, ownership inscription dated August 1824 on lower flyleaf, signature on title and lower pastedown, a few marginal notes -- Semi-legible library ink stamp on title ("Service des Boucheries"...?). " /> MEDINA, PEDRO DE. L'Art de Naviguer... Traduict de Castillan en François... par Nicolas de Nicolai... Reveu nouvellement & corrigé par ledict S. de Nicolai, avec amendement de plusieurs figures. Lyon: Guillaume Rouillé 1576. <I>4to, 231 x 168 mm.(9 1/16 x 6 5/8 in.), contemporary limp vellum, soiled and wrinkled, sewing partly loose, blank fore-margin of title-leaf torn away and repaired, upper corner of fol. A1 torn and creased affecting ornamental border and 2 letters on verso, dampstaining, corners thumbed, three minor small stains to folding map</I>. Fifth French edition (fourth Rouillé edition), translation by Nicolas de Nicolai. Collation: *<SUP>4</SUP> A-Z Aa-Kk<SUP>4</SUP>; 136 leaves. Woodcut printer's device on title, approximately 80 woodcuts in the text, mainly astronomical diagrams, small woodcut map of the world at the head of books 3 and 8 (F4v and Hh1r), folding engraved map of Europe, part of Africa and the New World by Nicolas de Nicolai, historiated and ornamental woodcut and metalcut initials, type ornament head-pieces. Alden 576/27; Baudrier IX:357-8; Burden 19; Palau 159673; Sabin 47345 (note); cf. Shirley 84 (mistakenly stating that to his knowledge no French editions contain the woodcut world map). Medina's <I>Arte de navegar</I> was first translated into French in 1553 (most copies of this first edition are dated 1554), and appears to have been more frequently reprinted in that language than in any other. The translation by the pilot and hydrographer Nicolas de Nicolai (later Premier Cosmographer of France) presumably proved particular useful to the wave of French explorers who made the Atlantic voyage during the latter half of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, supported by the French throne, desirous of establishing a French presence in the New World that would rival that of Spain. Nicolai's woodcuts are based on those of the Spanish edition, but his large engraved map of Europe, Africa and the Americas is much more detailed than the simple woodcut outline map used in the original Spanish edition. "The map clearly shows more knowledge of Cartier's voyages up the St. Lawrence River than its predecessor, with many more islands in the Gulf. Along the eastern seaboard new nomenclature appears... The Bahamas are represented and Yucatan is still an island" (Burden). All French sixteenth-century editions are rare. <I>Provenance</I>: Couriol fils, of the Eure, ownership inscription dated August 1824 on lower flyleaf, signature on title and lower pastedown, a few marginal notes -- Semi-legible library ink stamp on title ("Service des Boucheries"...?). | Christie's