Geographia universalis, and reprinted in later editions of that text and in the nearly 40 editions of Münster's Cosmographia (of which the first appeared in 1544). This copy corresponds to Burden's state 13, from the 1572 edition of the Cosmographia (the many states of the map are principally variants in the letterpress place-names). The map contains "a prime example of the false sea of Verrazzano" (Schwartz and Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, p. 50), extending eastward from the Pacific Ocean into the North American continent, based on Verrazzano's misconception of the Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds in the Outer Banks of the Carolinas, when he explored the area in 1524, as an "Oriental Sea" that he assumed would lead westward to the Pacific. "Here Münster perpetuates this error and through the success of [the Cosmography] provided a huge impetus to the exploration of the region"--Burden 12; Tooley, Maps and Mapmakers, p. 112, pl. 80. " /> MÜNSTER, SEBASTIAN. Novae Insulae. [Basel, 1572]. <I>Woodcut map, single sheet, 289 x 390 mm. (15 3/8 x 11 3/8 in.), repaired tear along central fold with slight loss to image, affected areas supplied in careful ink facsimile, tipped to a mat</I>. "The first printed map of the American continents showing continuity beween North and South America and no connection with any other landmass" (Schwartz and Ehrenberg, p. 45), first printed in 1540 in Münster's edition of Ptolemy's <I>Geographia universalis</I>, and reprinted in later editions of that text and in the nearly 40 editions of Münster's <I>Cosmographia</I> (of which the first appeared in 1544). This copy corresponds to Burden's state 13, from the 1572 edition of the <I>Cosmographia</I> (the many states of the map are principally variants in the letterpress place-names). The map contains "a prime example of the false sea of Verrazzano" (Schwartz and Ehrenberg, <I>The Mapping of America</I>, p. 50), extending eastward from the Pacific Ocean into the North American continent, based on Verrazzano's misconception of the Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds in the Outer Banks of the Carolinas, when he explored the area in 1524, as an "Oriental Sea" that he assumed would lead westward to the Pacific. "Here Münster perpetuates this error and through the success of [the <I>Cosmography</I>] provided a huge impetus to the exploration of the region"--Burden 12; Tooley, <I>Maps and Mapmakers</I>, p. 112, pl. 80. | Christie's