The Rivals...I return to Oxford on Saturday...and should be disappointed to leave London without seeing you...I have just received your second note. It would have been very nice to go with you to Twelfth Night. Alas! I am engaged on the 11th...I shall probably see it some other night. Don't mind about going to the Play. I should be very pleased to pass the evening with you quietly"; Autograph letter signed to Madame Marie Raffalovich (Marc-André's mother), [London], n.d. [1884], 2 pages, 12mo, foxed: "...I take this opportunity of telling you how much pleasure I have found in the acquaintance of your son André, for whom I hope all the happiness in life which his charming character, and interesting mind, deserves. Should you ever visit Oxford, it will be an honour to make you acquainted with its remarkable objects..."; Autograph quotation signed, n.p., 3 May 1887, one page, oblong 12mo, on stiff card, remnants of mounting on verso: "Ah! voilà les âmes quill fallnoit à la mienne." Marc-André Raffalovich, Uranian poet and quintessential fin-de-siècle figure, "was the son of a rich Russian banker resident in Paris, and came to London in 1884 with the intention of going to Oxford. His health disallowed the move and instead he set about collecting a large and distinguished group of friends including Beardsley [, Pater] and the young poet, John Gray, whom Raffalovich was later to follow into the Catholic Church" (Timothy d'Arch Smith, Love in Earnest, London, 1970, p. 30). See also the chapter "Wilde, Gray and Raffalovich" in Rupert Croft-Cooke, Feasting with Panthers (New York, 1968), pp. 191-226. The two Pater letters are printed in Letters. (3) " /> PATER, WALTER. Autograph letter signed to Marc-André Raffalovich, [London], 4 July [1884], <I>3 pages, 12mo</I>, fixing a social engagement with Raffalovich: "...I should be very pleased to spend the evening with yourself, or go to the play, if you like. I have seen <I>The Rivals</I>...I return to Oxford on Saturday...and should be disappointed to leave London without seeing you...I have just received your second note. It would have been very nice to go with you to <I>Twelfth Night.</I> Alas! I am engaged on the 11th...I shall probably see it some other night. Don't mind about going to the Play. I should be very pleased to pass the evening with you quietly"; Autograph letter signed to Madame Marie Raffalovich (Marc-André's mother), [London], n.d. [1884], <I>2 pages, 12mo, foxed</I>: "...I take this opportunity of telling you how much pleasure I have found in the acquaintance of your son André, for whom I hope all the happiness in life which his charming character, and interesting mind, deserves. Should you ever visit Oxford, it will be an honour to make you acquainted with its remarkable objects..."; Autograph quotation signed, n.p., 3 May 1887, <I>one page, oblong 12mo, on stiff card, remnants of mounting on verso</I>: "Ah! voilà les âmes quill fallnoit à la mienne." Marc-André Raffalovich, Uranian poet and quintessential <I>fin-de-siècle</I> figure, "was the son of a rich Russian banker resident in Paris, and came to London in 1884 with the intention of going to Oxford. His health disallowed the move and instead he set about collecting a large and distinguished group of friends including Beardsley [, Pater] and the young poet, John Gray, whom Raffalovich was later to follow into the Catholic Church" (Timothy d'Arch Smith, <I>Love in Earnest</I>, London, 1970, p. 30). See also the chapter "Wilde, Gray and Raffalovich" in Rupert Croft-Cooke, <I>Feasting with Panthers</I> (New York, 1968), pp. 191-226. The two Pater letters are printed in <I>Letters</I>. (3) | Christie's