2 pages, 8vo, portion of integral blank leaf: "I send you my Paper upon [John] Donne. You can have the underlined passages put in italics or not as you like. I don't like the practice, but as some readers are deaf to true poetry till it is uttered loudly in a different type, perhaps it might be charitable to consider them. I fear that the Paper is longer than you thought for: it is much longer than I at first intended to make it. If I can get a shorter article upon [Sir John] Suckling ready by tomorrow evening's post I will, and you can then, if you choose keep Donne for March..."; Autograph letter signed to an archbishop (probably Richard Chenevix Trench, Archbishop of Dublin and a popular poet), "British Museum," London, 8 July 1865, one page, 8vo, on blue paper, thanking him for sending a volume of his poems: "...May I say that they belong to a class which I like better the older I become..."; Autograph letter signed ("C. Patmore") to his daughter Gertrude ("My dear Trudy"), Uckfield, 10 June 1872, 4 pages, 8vo, on blue paper, slight wrinkling, giving news of life in the country and of the family, and discussing religion (Patmore became a Roman Catholic in 1864): "...Emily [another daughter]...is to go to St. Leonards as a Postulant at Christmas[.] Henry [his son] very likely will be a Priest; so that at least two out of the six [children] are almost sure to lead good and happy lives. Perhaps when you get older you will want to be a nun too. But that is a matter in which it is of no use wishing, since it does not depend on the will of any but God, who has made some people able, and some unable, to obey Him perfectly and so become really happy..."; Autograph letter signed to Canon Richard Watson Dixson (fellow poet and Pre-Raphaelite associate), Hastings, 7 March 1884, 2 pages, 8vo, with envlope: "I have received a copy of your Odes & Ecologues, and presume that I am indebted to your kindness. If to admire your poetry is a claim to be one of the favored hundred in which the Odes are printed [100 copies were issued] I have certainly a title. These foul times are not worthy of words so delicate and true, and you are no doubt right in not casting your pearls before swine..." With initialed note by Dixon at end: "I did not send him a copy"; Autograph letter signed "To the Editor of the Tablet," n.p. [ca. 1886], 2 pages, 8vo, giving his opinion that Thomas Woolner's bust of Cardinal Newman is the best likeness, conveying "the weight of Newman's intellect and character...it made all the rest [various busts of other famous people that Patmore had viewed in a room] look like vegetables in comparison with it..."; Autograph letter signed to Arthur Waugh [father of Evelyn], Lymington, 12 January 1892, 2 pages, 8vo, integral blank leaf with remnants of mounting, hardening support for a proposed new member at the Athenaeum club; Autograph letter signed to Dr. J.J. Garth Wilkinson, Lymington, 23 February 1892, 2 pages, 12mo, integral blank leaf, with envelope: "...I quite agree with you as to the future of poetry, and have myself endeavoured to take the first (modern) step in that direction"; together 7 letters, 15 pages, mostly 8vo. (7) " /> PATMORE, COVENTRY. Autograph letter signed to "My dear Sir," Mendon, 16 January 1846, <I>2 pages, 8vo, portion of integral blank leaf</I>: "I send you my Paper upon [John] Donne. You can have the underlined passages put in italics or not as you like. I don't like the practice, but as some readers are deaf to true poetry till it is uttered <I>loudly</I> in a different type, perhaps it might be charitable to consider them. I fear that the Paper is longer than you thought for: it is much longer than I at first intended to make it. If I can get a shorter article upon [Sir John] <I>Suckling</I> ready by tomorrow evening's post I will, and you can then, if you choose keep Donne for March..."; Autograph letter signed to an archbishop (probably Richard Chenevix Trench, Archbishop of Dublin and a popular poet), "British Museum," London, 8 July 1865, <I>one page, 8vo, on blue paper</I>, thanking him for sending a volume of his poems: "...May I say that they belong to a class which I like better the older I become..."; Autograph letter signed ("C. Patmore") to his daughter Gertrude ("My dear Trudy"), Uckfield, 10 June 1872, <I>4 pages, 8vo, on blue paper, slight wrinkling</I>, giving news of life in the country and of the family, and discussing religion (Patmore became a Roman Catholic in 1864): "...Emily [another daughter]...is to go to St. Leonards as a Postulant at Christmas[.] Henry [his son] very likely will be a Priest; so that at least two out of the six [children] are almost sure to lead good and happy lives. Perhaps when you get older you will want to be a nun too. But that is a matter in which it is of no use wishing, since it does not depend on the will of any but God, who has made some people able, and some unable, to obey Him perfectly and so become really happy..."; Autograph letter signed to Canon Richard Watson Dixson (fellow poet and Pre-Raphaelite associate), Hastings, 7 March 1884, <I>2 pages, 8vo, with envlope</I>: "I have received a copy of your <I>Odes & Ecologues</I>, and presume that I am indebted to your kindness. If to admire your poetry is a claim to be one of the favored hundred in which the <I>Odes</I> are printed [100 copies were issued] I have certainly a title. These foul times are not worthy of words so delicate and true, and you are no doubt right in not casting your pearls before swine..." With initialed note by Dixon at end: "I did not send him a copy"; Autograph letter signed "To the Editor of the <I>Tablet</I>," n.p. [ca. 1886], <I>2 pages, 8vo</I>, giving his opinion that Thomas Woolner's bust of Cardinal Newman is the best likeness, conveying "the weight of Newman's intellect and character...it made all the rest [various busts of other famous people that Patmore had viewed in a room] look like <I>vegetables</I> in comparison with it..."; Autograph letter signed to Arthur Waugh [father of Evelyn], Lymington, 12 January 1892, <I>2 pages, 8vo, integral blank leaf with remnants of mounting</I>, hardening support for a proposed new member at the Athenaeum club; Autograph letter signed to Dr. J.J. Garth Wilkinson, Lymington, 23 February 1892, <I>2 pages, 12mo, integral blank leaf, with envelope</I>: "...I quite agree with you as to the future of poetry, and have myself endeavoured to take the first (modern) step in that direction"; <I>together 7 letters, 15 pages, mostly 8vo.</I> (7) | Christie's