3 1/2 pages, 8vo: "I thank you heartily for the friendly gift of your Fourth Part [undoubtedly The Earthly Paradise, Part IV, published in 1870], and also congratulate you on finishing so great & difficult a work with such admirable success. I will not attempt any criticism -- but will say it seems to me on the whole equal to any of its predecessors. Bellerophon I thought magnificent -- & the Golden Apples among the very first things of its kind..." The Colbeck Collection (p. 578) has a set of The Earthly Paradise inscribed from Morris to Allingham.; Autograph letter signed twice (initials) to Frederic George Stephens, ("Dear S.") Hampstead, 4 November 1889, one page, oblong 8vo, address imprinted in red: "I am sending you the [William] Blakes -- keeping 'Europe' with much gratitude. Have an eye out for 'Songs of Innocence'...Would you care to have one of [Thomas] Carlyle's bookplates?"--MILLAIS, JOHN EVERETT. Autograph letter signed to William Michael Rossetti ("My dear Rossetti"), Perth, 10 June 1856, 3 pages, 8vo, traces of mounting on verso of integral second leaf, thanking Rossetti for congratulations on the birth of his first child and revealing a rather cavalier attitude to one of his early paintings: "The child holding the dove is intended for a girl, & was painted from a girl but I don't consider it altogether necessary that people should understand it to be one. 'They pays their money & they takes their choice' should, (in fact does) apply to all productions in Art. I am a little surprised that this child is taken for a male as she distinctly wears a comb...Now the other child [his newborn son] may well be taken for either, indeed I don't know myself which it looks most like..."--ROSSETTI, WILLIAM MICHAEL. One autograph letter signed to the poet Canon Richard Watson Dixon and two autograph letters signed (all signed "W.M. Rossetti") to Mrs. Dixon, London, 21 February 1888, 18 November 1903, and 11 January 1904, together 7 1/2 pages, 8vo, (mostly) and 12mo, with envelopes. 21 February 1888 (to Canon Dixon, 5 pp., 8vo, on black-bordered mourning stationery), entirely about Rossetti's Life of John Keats, published in 1887: "...My little book upon Keats seems to be mostly regarded with disfavour...it is generally assumed that I have tried to 'run down' Keats, & am callous to that particular range of poetic faculty which characterizes him to most...I cannot but be gratified at the general substance of your letter -- not to speak of the generous terms emplyed. As to hostile criticisms, I am fortunately very different from my dear brother [Dante Gabriel], & take them easily enough...About the inconsistency which I see (or suppose that I see) in the 'Ode to a Nightingale,' a friend was arguing with me some while ago that, tho' it may be a logical inconsistency, it is nevertheless a beauty in relation to the whole tone of feeling in that Ode. This however is what I never denied..." The two letters to Mrs. Dixon (the Canon died in 1900) regard the return of a D.G. Rossetti letter and a Canon Dixon letter for publication purposes--WOOLNER, THOMAS. Autograph letter signed to Tom Taylor (playwright and editor of Punch), London, 4 December 1856, 2 pages, 8vo: "I sent the med:[allion] framed [of Wordsworth, the bill for same is in the text of the letter] this morning as you wished. I am doing a bust in marble of Tennyson and have done a med: of Browning which I should like you to see when you have time to come my way..."; together 7 letters, 17 pages. Morris, Stephens, Millais, Rossetti, and Woolner were among the seven original members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood; Allingham and Dixon were Pre-Raphaelite associates. (7) " /> [PRE-RAPHAELITES]. ALLINGHAM, WILLIAM. Autograph letter signed ("W. Allingham") TO WILLIAM MORRIS, [London], 22 December n.y. [1870], <I>3 1/2 pages, 8vo</I>: "I thank you heartily for the friendly gift of your Fourth Part [undoubtedly <I>The Earthly Paradise</I>, Part IV, published in 1870], and also congratulate you on finishing so great & difficult a work with such admirable success. I will not attempt any criticism -- but will say it seems to me on the whole equal to any of its predecessors. Bellerophon I thought magnificent -- & the Golden Apples among the very first things of its kind..." The Colbeck Collection (p. 578) has a set of <I>The Earthly Paradise</I> inscribed from Morris to Allingham.; Autograph letter signed twice (initials) to Frederic George Stephens, ("Dear S.") Hampstead, 4 November 1889, <I>one page, oblong 8vo, address imprinted in red</I>: "I am sending you the [William] Blakes -- keeping 'Europe' with much gratitude. Have an eye out for 'Songs of Innocence'...Would you care to have one of [Thomas] Carlyle's bookplates?"--MILLAIS, JOHN EVERETT. Autograph letter signed to William Michael Rossetti ("My dear Rossetti"), Perth, 10 June 1856, <I>3 pages, 8vo, traces of mounting on verso of integral second leaf</I>, thanking Rossetti for congratulations on the birth of his first child and revealing a rather cavalier attitude to one of his early paintings: "The child holding the dove is intended for a girl, & was painted from a girl but I don't consider it altogether necessary that people should understand it to be one. 'They pays their money & they takes their choice' should, (in fact does) apply to all productions in Art. I am a little surprised that this child is taken for a <I>male</I> as she distinctly wears a comb...Now the other child [his newborn son] may well be taken for either, indeed I don't know myself which it looks most like..."--ROSSETTI, WILLIAM MICHAEL. One autograph letter signed to the poet Canon Richard Watson Dixon and two autograph letters signed (all signed "W.M. Rossetti") to Mrs. Dixon, London, 21 February 1888, 18 November 1903, and 11 January 1904, <I>together 7 1/2 pages, 8vo, (mostly) and 12mo, with envelopes</I>. 21 February 1888 (to Canon Dixon, <I>5 pp., 8vo, on black-bordered mourning stationery</I>), entirely about Rossetti's <I>Life of John Keats</I>, published in 1887: "...My little book upon Keats seems to be mostly regarded with disfavour...it is generally assumed that I have tried to 'run down' Keats, & am callous to that particular range of poetic faculty which characterizes him to most...I cannot but be gratified at the general substance of your letter -- not to speak of the generous terms emplyed. As to <I>hostile</I> criticisms, I am fortunately very different from my dear brother [Dante Gabriel], & take them easily enough...About the inconsistency which I see (or <I>suppose</I> that I see) in the 'Ode to a Nightingale,' a friend was arguing with me some while ago that, tho' it may be a logical inconsistency, it is nevertheless a beauty in relation to the whole tone of feeling in that Ode. This however is what I never denied..." The two letters to Mrs. Dixon (the Canon died in 1900) regard the return of a D.G. Rossetti letter and a Canon Dixon letter for publication purposes--WOOLNER, THOMAS. Autograph letter signed to Tom Taylor (playwright and editor of <I>Punch</I>), London, 4 December 1856, <I>2 pages, 8vo</I>: "I sent the med:[allion] framed [of Wordsworth, the bill for same is in the text of the letter] this morning as you wished. I am doing a bust in marble of Tennyson and have done a med: of Browning which I should like you to see when you have time to come my way..."; <I>together 7 letters, 17 pages</I>. Morris, Stephens, Millais, Rossetti, and Woolner were among the seven original members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood; Allingham and Dixon were Pre-Raphaelite associates. (7) | Christie's