3½ pp., 8vo. Pierce informs Morse of the imminent retirement of Dartmouth President, Dr. Lord: "Dr Lord after having devoted more than thirty four years of his life to Darthmouth College...under the circumstances set forth in his admirable letter. not worth the house in which he lives. Dr. Lord's friends in N.H. will contribute to the fund which it is proposed to present to him...It would be very agreeable if the total sum could be made to amount to $10,000." Pierce discreetly asks Morse for his support: "We cannot allow fanaticism to strike down this valuable, brave patriotic man, without a demonstration on the part of his friends of appreciation & relief. Should you incline to take an interest in the subject suggested...please direct to Concord N.H." Pierce tells Morse that he must pre-pay postage "as the franking privilege of retired Presidents & their widows was repealed by the act of the last session of Congress." -- ROOSEVELT, Theodore. Autograph letter signed ("Theodore Roosevelt") to William Round, Albany, 6 March 1884. 1 p., 8vo, mourning stationery. Roosevelt writes to a member of the National Prison Association's Executive Committee: "I thank you very heartily for your congratulations. I watched the Conference with great interest." - GRANT, Ulysses S. Letter signed ("U.S. Grant") to William Round, New York, 25 September 1883. 1 p., 4to, Mexican Southern Railroad Company stationery. Grant informs Round that he will be unable to write an article "on 'Civil Service Reform' as applied to Prison Organization" as he has "not the time to write an article on the subject" and must "beg to be excused." Together three items. (3) " /> [PRESIDENTS]. PIERCE, Franklin. Autograph letter signed ("Franklin Pierce") TO SAMUEL F.B. MORSE, "Pigeon Cove, Cape Ann," 6 August 1863. <I>3½ pp., 8vo</I>. Pierce informs Morse of the imminent retirement of Dartmouth President, Dr. Lord: "Dr Lord after having devoted more than thirty four years of his life to Darthmouth College...under the circumstances set forth in his admirable letter. <I>not worth the house in which he lives</I>. Dr. Lord's friends in N.H. will contribute to the fund which it is proposed to present to him...It would be very agreeable if the total sum could be made to amount to $10,000." Pierce discreetly asks Morse for his support: "We cannot allow fanaticism to strike down this valuable, brave patriotic man, without a demonstration on the part of his friends of appreciation & relief. Should you incline to take an interest in the subject suggested...please direct to Concord N.H." Pierce tells Morse that he must pre-pay postage "as the franking privilege of retired Presidents & their widows was repealed by the act of the last session of Congress." -- ROOSEVELT, Theodore. Autograph letter signed ("Theodore Roosevelt") to William Round, Albany, 6 March 1884. <I>1 p., 8vo, mourning stationery</I>. Roosevelt writes to a member of the National Prison Association's Executive Committee: "I thank you very heartily for your congratulations. I watched the Conference with great interest." - GRANT, Ulysses S. Letter signed ("U.S. Grant") to William Round, New York, 25 September 1883. <I>1 p., 4to, Mexican Southern Railroad Company stationery</I>. Grant informs Round that he will be unable to write an article "on 'Civil Service Reform' as applied to Prison Organization" as he has "not the time to write an article on the subject" and must "beg to be excused." <I>Together three items</I>. (3) | Christie's