Swann, and that it no longer exists for him, ('j'en dis qu'elle n'existe plus pour moi, et je ne dis pas que tu en sois cause, ce serait trop long à expliquer'), 8 pages, 8vo, (annotated by Daudet at the head, 'Commencement 16'). Lucien Daudet records that Proust's words on the failure of his belief in friendship caused him great distress (Cahier, V, 178). Antoine Bibesco wrote later of his wintry attitude to love and friendship ('his heart closed against the experience of love and the enrichment it brings in its train') and wondered if he knew the compensatory joys of friendship. It is a subject to which the Narrator in A la recherche du temps perdu returns on a number of occasions. The reference to Lucien's travels is to his visit with Léon to Holland and Sweden early in 1895, returning hastily for a dinner for Edmond de Goncourt. Proust wrote to Alphonse Daudet on 22 March 1895 proposing to find for 'Monsieur Lucien' a photograph of Goethe skating to illustrate Lucien's skating reminiscences. The Daudets travelled often, visiting England later in the year and Venice the next spring. Proust's reference to his visits to Bourg la Reine (suppressed in Soixante Lettres) is to the Daudet's country estate at Champrosay, which Madame Daudet left after her husband's death in 1897. Proust visited it during the passionate phase of his friendship with Lucien. In the letter he contrasts Lucien's state of mind ('l'effet d'un mauvais régime mental') with the calm behaviour and 'divine wisdom' of Alphonse Daudet, 'ton sublime père [qui] avait sur le destin de chacun des intuitions prodigieuses'. He returns in a letter written later to Alphonse's insights into his own case. Lucien's unhappiness at the time of the letter was probably due mostly to the frustration of his hopes of leaving Tours, where he remained a further two months. Various details in the letter were suppressed for publication. Kolb, XV, 247; Cahiers, V (XXXVII). " /> PROUST, Marcel. Autograph letter signed to Lucien Daudet, <I>n.p. [Paris], n.d. [early August 1916]</I>, supposing that his letter never arrived, the only one that was important because he wrote it after seeing Lucien so unhappy, and explaining the circumstances of writing and sending it, and that Lucien's letter reminding him of a visit to Florence (which did not take place), has made him despair, particularly since he used to think that it was Lucien who had the freedom ('aisance') of which he writes; recalling the early years of their friendship, 'et au seul point de vue voyage, c'est moi qui avais raison puisque au cours de ma sedentarité aracinée à jamais je te voyais successivement partir en patins faire en glissades le tour du monde en 48 heures, "faire" la Hollande, résider en Angleterre, et Venise, partout, le temps qu'il me fallait pour me decider de changer de chambre Bvd Malesherbes. Mes seules voyages, pendant ces temps furent de t'accompagner de Paris à Bourg la Reine'; and continuing about friendship and Lucien's state of mind, while denying that he is reproaching him; he used to believe in friendship but Lucien will see what he writes of it in <I>Swann</I>, and that it no longer exists for him, ('j'en dis qu'elle n'existe plus pour moi, et je ne dis pas que tu en sois cause, ce serait trop long à expliquer'), <I>8 pages, 8vo</I>, (annotated by Daudet at the head, 'Commencement 16'). Lucien Daudet records that Proust's words on the failure of his belief in friendship caused him great distress (<I>Cahier</I>, V, 178). Antoine Bibesco wrote later of his wintry attitude to love and friendship ('his heart closed against the experience of love and the enrichment it brings in its train') and wondered if he knew the compensatory joys of friendship. It is a subject to which the Narrator in <I>A la recherche du temps perdu</I> returns on a number of occasions. The reference to Lucien's travels is to his visit with Léon to Holland and Sweden early in 1895, returning hastily for a dinner for Edmond de Goncourt. Proust wrote to Alphonse Daudet on 22 March 1895 proposing to find for 'Monsieur Lucien' a photograph of Goethe skating to illustrate Lucien's skating reminiscences. The Daudets travelled often, visiting England later in the year and Venice the next spring. Proust's reference to his visits to Bourg la Reine (suppressed in <I>Soixante Lettres</I>) is to the Daudet's country estate at Champrosay, which Madame Daudet left after her husband's death in 1897. Proust visited it during the passionate phase of his friendship with Lucien. In the letter he contrasts Lucien's state of mind ('l'effet d'un mauvais régime mental') with the calm behaviour and 'divine wisdom' of Alphonse Daudet, 'ton sublime père [qui] avait sur le destin de chacun des intuitions prodigieuses'. He returns in a letter written later to Alphonse's insights into his own case. Lucien's unhappiness at the time of the letter was probably due mostly to the frustration of his hopes of leaving Tours, where he remained a further two months. Various details in the letter were suppressed for publication. Kolb, XV, 247; <I>Cahiers</I>, V (XXXVII). | Christie's