Swann'; and enquiring about addresses, with an affectionate subscription (unsigned), 10 pages, 8vo (integral leaf cut away from last page); the second n.d. [October 1920], 'Voici le Guermantes que tu demandes avec une couverture vraie qd je t'enverrai le livre'; also saying that he has written to Lucien's brother, and, in a postscript, that if he finds passages similar to those that were foreshadowed in 1913, nonetheless most of the volume is new, one page, 8vo (blank integral leaf; together 11 pages, 8vo). À l'ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs was first published in June 1919, and a new edition of Du Côté de chez Swann was also brought out by Gallimard. Pastiches et Mélanges had been published the previous March. Proust spent much of the summer complaining that a mysterious bookseller had bought up all the first editions and eventually sent out copies of the 3rd editions several months later. The scarcity of 1st editions was the result of their having been subscribed for in advance by the Société des Bibliophiles. Gaston Gallimard recalled his first meeting with Proust at the Cabourg dinner in a memoir, in Cahiers Marcel Proust, I (1923). Lucien had written on 14 September 1920, offering lyrical praise of the first volume of Guermantes which he had read in proof. It was dedicated to Léon Daudet, in gratitude for his powerful support for Proust's candidature for the Prix Goncourt awarded in December 1919. It brought him the fame that he had lacked for almost 30 years. (2) " /> PROUST, Marcel. One unpublished autograph letter signed and one autograph letter to Lucien Daudet, <I>n.p., n.d.</I>, the first [<I>1919 or 1920</I>], wondering if Lucien receives his letters and hoping that one will reach him at Paris or on the Monte Palatino, with a message for Madame Daudet relating 'mon incroyable histoire de 1ères editions accaparées par je ne sais quel libraire, si bien que j'en souffre mort et passion'; Albaret returns each evening having failed to find one, and he does not dare to send her the 3rd edition. He will send <I>Pastiches</I> or <I>À l'ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs</I> as soon as he finds one, 'On dirait vraiment que je crois "c'est arrivé", ces livres médiocres'; recalling a joke by Montesquiou, who would certainly take it badly if he sent him a 3rd edition; and remembering various amusing occasions including a dinner he gave at Cabourg attended by Gallimard, 'le dîner a du reste eu pour effet qu'il a refusé <I>Swann</I>'; and enquiring about addresses, with an affectionate subscription (unsigned), <I>10 pages, 8vo</I> (integral leaf cut away from last page); the second <I>n.d. [October 1920]</I>, 'Voici le <I>Guermantes</I> que tu demandes avec une couverture vraie q<SUP>d</SUP> je t'enverrai le livre'; also saying that he has written to Lucien's brother, and, in a postscript, that if he finds passages similar to those that were foreshadowed in 1913, nonetheless most of the volume is new, <I>one page, 8vo (blank integral leaf; <I>together 11 pages, 8vo</I>). <I>À l'ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs</I> was first published in June 1919, and a new edition of <I>Du Côté de chez Swann</I> was also brought out by Gallimard. <I>Pastiches et Mélanges</I> had been published the previous March. Proust spent much of the summer complaining that a mysterious bookseller had bought up all the first editions and eventually sent out copies of the 3rd editions several months later. The scarcity of 1st editions was the result of their having been subscribed for in advance by the Société des Bibliophiles. Gaston Gallimard recalled his first meeting with Proust at the Cabourg dinner in a memoir, in <I>Cahiers Marcel Proust</I>, I (1923). Lucien had written on 14 September 1920, offering lyrical praise of the first volume of <I>Guermantes</I> which he had read in proof. It was dedicated to Léon Daudet, in gratitude for his powerful support for Proust's candidature for the Prix Goncourt awarded in December 1919. It brought him the fame that he had lacked for almost 30 years. (2) | Christie's