4 pages, 8vo; the second asking him, if it is not too late, not to take the Montesquious' cards as he has already been given their hours, and Madame would be annoyed if he went at another time, but to take instead that of Madame de Kersaint whom he hardly knows; Reynaldo is reading to him and he has six things to do in the evening and will do none of them, 2 pages, 8vo; the third (incomplete, lacking final page), 'Ce dimanche' [circa 19 April 1896], consoling him in some unhappiness which his grandmother has hinted at, referring to his [Lucien's] travels, discussing various clichés, 'suivant les louchonneries à travers toutes les classes de la societé et tous les évènements de la vie'; writing of his interest in all things while Lucien is there and of the charm of their friendship; mentioning that Reynaldo is offering Lucien an introduction to Monsieur Fortuny in Venice, referring to an invitation from Madame de Kersaint, with more gossip about various society figures including Lord Dufferin [the British ambassador], 8 pages, 8vo (on pale grey paper, ending in mid-sentence); the fourth ('Cher Luc'), doubting if he will have the courage to go to the rue de l'Université, after having to dine at his aunt's as she has had a trivial accident, one page, 8vo (written in pencil, signature faint, addressed on verso, integral leaf torn away; altogether 4 letters, 15 pages, 8vo). The 'fou rire' were the paroxysms of the hysterical laughter to which both Proust and Lucien Daudet frequently succumbed in the early years of their friendship, provoked by the absurdity of others. The third letter, written while Lucien was in Italy with his family in the summer of 1896, may be dated from a reference in a published letter to Madame de Kersaint's invitation (Kolb, II, 57, notes 5 and 6). (4) " /> PROUST, Marcel. Three unpublished autograph letters signed and one autograph letter (incomplete) to Lucien Daudet, <I>all n.p., [Paris], n.d.</I>, the first ('mon petit Lucien') asking to be excused from dining on Sunday especially because of the business of 'fou rire', and 'le théâtre me donnant toujours des crises j'aime vraiment mieux vous voir autrement'; if he comes later there will be no cause of agitation, 'aucune cause d'agitation, aucun risque de crise, aucune crainte de fou rire'; he is not writing all this to Madame Daudet and hopes Lucien has kept it ' "sous votre bonnet" ', with further explanations and excuses, <I>4 pages, 8vo</I>; the second asking him, if it is not too late, not to take the Montesquious' cards as he has already been given their hours, and Madame would be annoyed if he went at another time, but to take instead that of Madame de Kersaint whom he hardly knows; Reynaldo is reading to him and he has six things to do in the evening and will do none of them, <I>2 pages, 8vo</I>; the third (<I>incomplete</I>, lacking final page), '<I>Ce dimanche' [circa 19 April 1896]</I>, consoling him in some unhappiness which his grandmother has hinted at, referring to his [Lucien's] travels, discussing various clichés, 'suivant les louchonneries à travers toutes les classes de la societé et tous les évènements de la vie'; writing of his interest in all things while Lucien is there and of the charm of their friendship; mentioning that Reynaldo is offering Lucien an introduction to Monsieur Fortuny in Venice, referring to an invitation from Madame de Kersaint, with more gossip about various society figures including Lord Dufferin [the British ambassador], <I>8 pages, 8vo</I> (on pale grey paper, ending in mid-sentence); the fourth ('Cher Luc'), doubting if he will have the courage to go to the rue de l'Université, after having to dine at his aunt's as she has had a trivial accident, <I>one page, 8vo</I> (written in pencil, signature faint, addressed on verso, integral leaf torn away; <I>altogether 4 letters, 15 pages, 8vo</I>). The 'fou rire' were the paroxysms of the hysterical laughter to which both Proust and Lucien Daudet frequently succumbed in the early years of their friendship, provoked by the absurdity of others. The third letter, written while Lucien was in Italy with his family in the summer of 1896, may be dated from a reference in a published letter to Madame de Kersaint's invitation (Kolb, II, 57, notes 5 and 6). (4) | Christie's