12 pages, 8vo (endorsed by Daudet on the 1st page, 'Guerre 1915 et 1916'): the second n.p. /Paris/, n.d. /20 September 1915/,, enclosing three letters [not present] for the doctors he has recommended and warning him, 'Surtout ne remettez l'une dans l'enveloppe de l'autre car je n'ai pas dit les même choses à cause de diversité des destinataires'; mentioning the mayor of Cabourg, and with a final admonition not on any account to put this letter into one of the envelopes for the doctors, and a postscript referring to Lucien's apparently shocked comment on the postscript to the previous letter, 7 pages, 8vo (the last line on the postscript erased, together 19 pages, 8vo). Proust weighs up the merits of doctors in Caen, Cabourg and Le Havre where there is an eminent one to whom he sent a copy of Swann and who wrote charmingly about it. In the postscript to the first letter which Lucien found 'monstrueux', Proust had asked him not to mention to any of the doctors that he (Proust) is ruined. Daudet, who for publication suppressed the names of all the doctors, was required in July 1915 to go to Caen for medical examination to confirm his place on the reserve list. Proust himself had served as a volunteer with an infantry regiment in Orléans in 1889, and was removed from the territorial army lists only in 1911. Wartime regulations now required that he underwent a new examination, although he was permanently unfitted by asthma and insomnia for any way of life other than that which he had adopted. Kolb, XIV, 226 and 232. Cahiers V (XV and XVI). (2) " /> PROUST, Marcel. Two autograph letters signed to Lucien Daudet, the first <I>n.p. [Paris], n.d. [September 1915]</I>, asking forgiveness and explaining his embarrassment because he had Lucien's letter and could easily have received him, but Céleste misplaced it and he found it only on Thursday evening; expressing his great anxiety over Lucien's bronchitis at Caen and making various suggestions about doctors, describing also the visits he has himself had from the military doctors. 'J'ai été visité et contre-visité par des Majors que je ne connais pas ... Ils ne savent pas que Papa et Robert était et est médecins et ils m'ont dit chaque fois "Vous êtes architecte n'est-ce-pas". Mais j'étais si malade que le cas n'était pas douteux', also describing an incident of complete medical incompetence witnessed by Reynaldo and cautioning Lucien further about his health, with a postscript, <I>12 pages, 8vo</I> (endorsed by Daudet on the 1st page, 'Guerre 1915 et 1916'): the second <I>n.p. /Paris/, n.d. /20 September 1915/,</I>, enclosing three letters [not present] for the doctors he has recommended and warning him, 'Surtout ne remettez l'une dans l'enveloppe de l'autre car je n'ai pas dit les même choses à cause de diversité des destinataires'; mentioning the mayor of Cabourg, and with a final admonition not on any account to put this letter into one of the envelopes for the doctors, and a postscript referring to Lucien's apparently shocked comment on the postscript to the previous letter, <I>7 pages, 8vo</I> (the last line on the postscript erased, <I>together 19 pages, 8vo</I>). Proust weighs up the merits of doctors in Caen, Cabourg and Le Havre where there is an eminent one to whom he sent a copy of <I>Swann</I> and who wrote charmingly about it. In the postscript to the first letter which Lucien found 'monstrueux', Proust had asked him not to mention to any of the doctors that he (Proust) is ruined. Daudet, who for publication suppressed the names of all the doctors, was required in July 1915 to go to Caen for medical examination to confirm his place on the reserve list. Proust himself had served as a volunteer with an infantry regiment in Orléans in 1889, and was removed from the territorial army lists only in 1911. Wartime regulations now required that he underwent a new examination, although he was permanently unfitted by asthma and insomnia for any way of life other than that which he had adopted. Kolb, XIV, 226 and 232. <I>Cahiers</I> V (XV and XVI). (2) | Christie's