sic] he adds, apologising for the 'teacherish' tone of the letter, 4 pages, 8vo; the second n.d. [early June 1916], worrying that Lucien has paid too much attention to what he said, and stressing his interest in his correspondent's essays, 'Je suis d'une folle curiosité de "Comprenez-vous les uns les autres" et j'ai déja fait dans ma tête l'article que j'écrirai sur le pont ['Le Pont Suspendu']; asking to be told if Madame Daudet's lecture appears in a review, referring to an invitation from 'Madame G', and to Madame Zola, to problems with his eyes, and also mentioning Maurice Rostand, 4 pages, 8vo (together 8 pages, 8vo). Alphonse Daudet's childhood was spent near Nîmes and it is to his Provençal origins that Proust refers in the first letter, saying that to talk of Paris one must know how not to be Parisian 'comme ton père a su délicieusement et terriblement ne pas être du Midi quand il parle du Midi'. In his introduction to Soixante Lettres, Lucien Daudet writes of Proust's continual attempt to see the world of which he writes as long inaccessible, and then, on entering it, to 'discover' it. The historian Gustave Schlumberger had been an habitué of Madame Straus's salon until he defected to the anti-Dreyfusards. Proust refers to him derisively in a number of letters. An unpublished passage (of 7 lines) at the end of the second letter refers to Maurice Rostand's kindness to Emile Agostinelli, 'le frère de mon ami qui s'est tué en aeroplane (frère bien peu intéressant d'ailleurs), qu'il a placé partout et finalement chez lui'. Madame Daudet's lecture had been given on 6 June 1916, at the Lyceum, during a conference organised by Lucien Daudet's right-wing journal, l'Action Française. Proust as he indicates here had been unable to attend. Lucien remained unconvinced by Proust's enthousiasm for 'Le Pont Suspendu', and eventually discarded it. Kolb, XV, 154 and 155; Cahiers, V (XXIX and XXXVI). (2) " /> PROUST, Marcel. Two autograph letters signed to Lucien Daudet, <I>both n.p. [Paris]</I>, the first <I>n.d. [May or June 1916]</I>, promising despite being very unwell to carry out a commission, and reflecting on their conversation the other evening; disagreeing with what Lucien said about Nîmes, '("MÎMES" !)', and Alphonse Daudet, and insisting that for the aesthetic discovery of reality, one must stand apart, 'Si tu me permets de comparer un instant un ver de terre à l'Himalaya, j'ai toujours eu soin quand j'ai parlé des Guermantes de ne pas les considérer en homme du monde ou du moins qui va ou a été dans le monde, mais avec ce qu'il peut y avoir de poésie dans le snobisme'. Without this distancing one would be like Shlumberger [<I>sic</I>] he adds, apologising for the 'teacherish' tone of the letter, <I>4 pages, 8vo</I>; the second <I>n.d. [early June 1916]</I>, worrying that Lucien has paid too much attention to what he said, and stressing his interest in his correspondent's essays, 'Je suis d'une folle curiosité de "Comprenez-vous les uns les autres" et j'ai déja fait dans ma tête l'article que j'écrirai sur le pont ['Le Pont Suspendu']; asking to be told if Madame Daudet's lecture appears in a review, referring to an invitation from 'Madame G', and to Madame Zola, to problems with his eyes, and also mentioning Maurice Rostand, <I>4 pages, 8vo (together 8 pages, 8vo)</I>. Alphonse Daudet's childhood was spent near Nîmes and it is to his Provençal origins that Proust refers in the first letter, saying that to talk of Paris one must know how not to be Parisian 'comme ton père a su délicieusement et terriblement ne pas être du Midi quand il parle du Midi'. In his introduction to <I>Soixante Lettres</I>, Lucien Daudet writes of Proust's continual attempt to see the world of which he writes as long inaccessible, and then, on entering it, to 'discover' it. The historian Gustave Schlumberger had been an habitué of Madame Straus's salon until he defected to the anti-Dreyfusards. Proust refers to him derisively in a number of letters. An unpublished passage (of 7 lines) at the end of the second letter refers to Maurice Rostand's kindness to Emile Agostinelli, 'le frère de mon ami qui s'est tué en aeroplane (frère bien peu intéressant d'ailleurs), qu'il a placé partout et finalement chez lui'. Madame Daudet's lecture had been given on 6 June 1916, at the Lyceum, during a conference organised by Lucien Daudet's right-wing journal, <I>l'Action Française</I>. Proust as he indicates here had been unable to attend. Lucien remained unconvinced by Proust's enthousiasm for 'Le Pont Suspendu', and eventually discarded it. Kolb, XV, 154 and 155; <I>Cahiers</I>, V (XXIX and XXXVI). (2) | Christie's