propriétaire, ending affectionately 'que tant de paroles ne te cachent pas combien je pense à toi, et combien aussi je suis malheureux', 4 pages, 8vo (on pale grey paper); the second n.d. [2 February 1918], explaining that their letters have crossed and he was prevented from having Lucien telephoned by a severe attack [of asthma]. 'Mon cher petit, je suis dans la dernière confusion de ta bonté, de la bonté de Madame Daudet, et de ma gaucherie d'avoir semblé ne pas répondre'. He will explain 'de vive voix' why he dare not accept for Monday but hopes to come later; sending also his compliments to Madame Daudet, 3½ pages, 8vo (on pale grey paper, slightly creased in centre fold and margins, slight off-setting of ink from signature) (together 7¼ pages, 8vo). The 'fausse Suedoise' of the first letter is Céleste Albaret, so called because of an initial confusion on Lucien Daudet's part when she first came to work for Proust in 1914. She is compared here with one of Francis Jammes' heroines. Kolb suggests that the unhappiness to which Proust refers in the last line is that fellow-feeling of suffering of which he wrote to Lucien at the end of December 1917 (see lot 105). Kolb, XVII, 89 and 91; Cahiers, V (XLI and XLII). (2) " /> PROUST, Marcel. Two autograph letters signed to Lucien Daudet, <I>both n.p. [Paris]</I>, the first </I> n.d. [1 February 1918]</I>, having re-read his correspondent's letter ('Je lis tes lettres et de temps en temps je les reprends') and explaining that he will do his best to come on Monday evening, but his heart is very bad, 'Je ne monte pas trois marches sans peril'; clearing up a misunderstanding about which Monday was intended, 'La faute était à la "fausse Suedoise" ... Elle est trop "Clara d'Ellebeuse" pour la vie de tous les jours'; gossiping about candidates for the Academy and a report that Henri Bordeaux will be elected while he thinks that 'Monsieur d'H' has more talent. He has met 'Une Lubersac qui n'est pas la tienne ... Elle a du reste l'air très gentil mais n'a rien qui supplée aux charme incomparable que j'appelle le charme d'Hinnisdael', and [in an unpublished sentence] recollecting that he has known since he was in skirts the Lubersac-Guitry who was his <I>propriétaire</I>, ending affectionately 'que tant de paroles ne te cachent pas combien je pense à toi, et combien aussi je suis malheureux', <I>4 pages, 8vo</I> (on pale grey paper); the second <I>n.d. [2 February 1918]</I>, explaining that their letters have crossed and he was prevented from having Lucien telephoned by a severe attack [of asthma]. 'Mon cher petit, je suis dans la dernière confusion de ta bonté, de la bonté de Madame Daudet, et de ma gaucherie d'avoir semblé ne pas répondre'. He will explain 'de vive voix' why he dare not accept for Monday but hopes to come later; sending also his compliments to Madame Daudet, <I>3½ pages, 8vo</I> (on pale grey paper, slightly creased in centre fold and margins, slight off-setting of ink from signature) (<I>together 7¼ pages, 8vo</I>). The 'fausse Suedoise' of the first letter is Céleste Albaret, so called because of an initial confusion on Lucien Daudet's part when she first came to work for Proust in 1914. She is compared here with one of Francis Jammes' heroines. Kolb suggests that the unhappiness to which Proust refers in the last line is that fellow-feeling of suffering of which he wrote to Lucien at the end of December 1917 (see lot 105). Kolb, XVII, 89 and 91; <I>Cahiers</I>, V (XLI and XLII). (2) | Christie's