2K1 torn and repaired, in vol. 3 lower blank corner of fol. P7 torn away, fols. Yy1-Zz2 with 2 small filled worm tracks at bottom causing slight loss to a few letters and to 3 of the 4 interleaved maps, minor creasing to "Nuova Francia" map, minor worming to last 2 leaves in vol. 3, scattered light mostly marginal foxing, a very few leaves browned or heavily foxed, particularly in vol. 2, marginal dampstaining to last 40 leaves of vol. 1 and first 45 leaves of vol. 3 and occasionally elsewhere. FIRST EDITION of vol. 1, third editions of vols. 2 and 3, 5 full-page woodcut plans and one full-page map of the Nile in vol. 1, vol. 3 with 7 double-page and 2 full-page woodcut maps, most after Giacomo Gastaldi, one full-page and numerous smaller woodcut text illustrations, woodcut printer's devices on titles and colophons, woodcut capital initials. Adams R-139 (vol. 2); Alden 550/31, 583/59, 606/86; Burden 34; Church 99 (different editions); Hill pp. 247-49; Sabin 67730, 67738, 67742. An important Americanum, among the earliest and most carefully compiled collections of voyages of the sixteenth century, containing many accounts not previously published. It "may be said to have opened a new era in the literary history of voyages and navigation. This work served as a model to Hakluyt and was the first great systematic collection that had so far appeared.... It contains translations of works that had appeared previously in French, Latin, and Spanish, as well as some from manuscripts... Among these voyages are some of which no other editions have ever been found so that Ramusio remains an authority of the first importance" (Hill). The third volume, devoted almost entirely to the Americas, contains the first published descriptions of Cartier's first voyage up the Amazon River and of Verrazzano's exploration of the North American coast from Florida to Canada, as well as one of the earliest descriptions of Mexico, by "un gentil-huomo del Signor Fernando Cortese." The woodblocks for this third edition of vol. 3 are exact copies of the blocks from the 1556 edition, which were destroyed in the fire at the Giunta printing-house in 1557. The illustrations depict native Americans and indigenous species such as maize, pineapple and cacti. The "Nuova Francia" map (Burden 34) is one of the earliest detailed maps of the New England region and Northeast coast, based on Verrazzano's account of his voyage (during which New York was sighted for the first time by a European), while the map of the American continent (Burden 35) is the first to show the discoveries of Coronado. The plan of the Indian village of Hochelaga is the "earliest printed view of Montreal... showing the native village and stockades[,] based on the information of Jacques Cartier" (Tooley, Mapping of America, p. 211), and is the first known printed plan of a village in North America. Publication of a projected fourth volume was aborted by Ramusio's death in 1557 and the fire at the Giunta printing house later the same year (the fire also destroyed the woodblocks for the maps for vol. 2). The first edition of vol. 1 -- rare on the market, no copies having apparently been sold at auction since 1962 -- does not include the 3 engraved double-page maps of Africa, India, and China, which were introduced only in the second edition of 1554. Provenance: A few eighteenth-century marginalia and underlinings in vol. I. (3) " /> RAMUSIO, GIOVANNI BATTISTA. Delle Navigationi et Viaggi. Venice: Heirs of Lucantonio Giunta 1550-1583-1606. <I>3 vols., folio, 296 x 204 mm. (11 5/8 x 8 in.) (v.2: 284 x 198 mm. [11 1/8 x 7¾ in.]), eighteenth- or early nineteenth-century vellum over pasteboard, spines lettered in ink, mottled red edges, corners bumped, some worming to backstrips, upper joint of vol. 2 cracked, vol. 1 title laid down and with small holes affecting text, in vol. 1, fols. *2-3 (dedication) with fore-margins strengthened, fol. C7 with inkstains and hole affecting a few letters, in vol. 2 the supplementary "Descrittione delle Sarmatia" misbound at front instead of at end, lower corner of fol. <SUP>2</SUP>K1 torn and repaired, in vol. 3 lower blank corner of fol. P7 torn away, fols. Yy1-Zz2 with 2 small filled worm tracks at bottom causing slight loss to a few letters and to 3 of the 4 interleaved maps, minor creasing to "Nuova Francia" map, minor worming to last 2 leaves in vol. 3, scattered light mostly marginal foxing, a very few leaves browned or heavily foxed, particularly in vol. 2, marginal dampstaining to last 40 leaves of vol. 1 and first 45 leaves of vol. 3 and occasionally elsewhere</I>. FIRST EDITION of vol. 1, third editions of vols. 2 and 3, 5 full-page woodcut plans and one full-page map of the Nile in vol. 1, vol. 3 with 7 double-page and 2 full-page woodcut maps, most after Giacomo Gastaldi, one full-page and numerous smaller woodcut text illustrations, woodcut printer's devices on titles and colophons, woodcut capital initials. Adams R-139 (vol. 2); Alden 550/31, 583/59, 606/86; Burden 34; Church 99 (different editions); Hill pp. 247-49; Sabin 67730, 67738, 67742. An important Americanum, among the earliest and most carefully compiled collections of voyages of the sixteenth century, containing many accounts not previously published. It "may be said to have opened a new era in the literary history of voyages and navigation. This work served as a model to Hakluyt and was the first great systematic collection that had so far appeared.... It contains translations of works that had appeared previously in French, Latin, and Spanish, as well as some from manuscripts... Among these voyages are some of which no other editions have ever been found so that Ramusio remains an authority of the first importance" (Hill). The third volume, devoted almost entirely to the Americas, contains the first published descriptions of Cartier's first voyage up the Amazon River and of Verrazzano's exploration of the North American coast from Florida to Canada, as well as one of the earliest descriptions of Mexico, by "un gentil-huomo del Signor Fernando Cortese." The woodblocks for this third edition of vol. 3 are exact copies of the blocks from the 1556 edition, which were destroyed in the fire at the Giunta printing-house in 1557. The illustrations depict native Americans and indigenous species such as maize, pineapple and cacti. The "Nuova Francia" map (Burden 34) is one of the earliest detailed maps of the New England region and Northeast coast, based on Verrazzano's account of his voyage (during which New York was sighted for the first time by a European), while the map of the American continent (Burden 35) is the first to show the discoveries of Coronado. The plan of the Indian village of Hochelaga is the "earliest printed view of Montreal... showing the native village and stockades[,] based on the information of Jacques Cartier" (Tooley, <I> Mapping of America</I>, p. 211), and is the first known printed plan of a village in North America. Publication of a projected fourth volume was aborted by Ramusio's death in 1557 and the fire at the Giunta printing house later the same year (the fire also destroyed the woodblocks for the maps for vol. 2). The first edition of vol. 1 -- rare on the market, no copies having apparently been sold at auction since 1962 -- does not include the 3 engraved double-page maps of Africa, India, and China, which were introduced only in the second edition of 1554. <I>Provenance</I>: A few eighteenth-century marginalia and underlinings in vol. I. (3) | Christie's