4 pages, 4to, closely written in ink with numerous revisions on the rectos of 4 sheets, with Sassoon's word count ("1750") in pencil at end, small marginal paper-clip stain on first page. This attack on much of the modern movement in poetry (William Empson and Ezra Pound in particular) is not listed in the Geoffrey Keynes bibliography of Sassoon and is possibly unpublished. A characteristic passage: "In poetry, as in other human concerns, there must always be a 'latest fashion.' Among critics who conceive themselves to be 'in the movement,' it is not the present fashion to discuss Ralph Hodgson; and very little attention is paid to de la Mare, Davies, A.E. Housman, Flecker, and Blunden. Charlotte Mew, who wrote several of the best poems of the last 20 years, is never mentioned. On the other hand, G.M. Hopkins (one of the supreme poets of the 19th century) has been 'taken up'...But the names which evoke the most solemn and profuse jargon are Yeats, D.H. Lawrence, and Eliot. I have long admired all these for variant reasons and in varying degrees of enthusiasm, but I have never regarded them as being, beyond argument, the master spirits of the age in poetry..."; Galley proofs of the essay "A Poet on Poetry," [London 1935], 2 sheets, long narrow folio, on proofing paper, with some pencilled markings by Sassoon and with the following autograph note by him in pencil at end: "(Written, by request, for The Listener, in 1935. Though set up, it was never published, owing to it's being a veiled attack on the modernists.)." (2) " /> SASSOON, SIEGFRIED. Autograph manuscript of the essay "What Hope for Poetry?", n.p., n.d. [c. 1935], <I>4 pages, 4to, closely written in ink with numerous revisions on the rectos of 4 sheets, with Sassoon's word count ("1750") in pencil at end, small marginal paper-clip stain on first page.</I> This attack on much of the modern movement in poetry (William Empson and Ezra Pound in particular) is not listed in the Geoffrey Keynes bibliography of Sassoon and is possibly unpublished. A characteristic passage: "In poetry, as in other human concerns, there must always be a 'latest fashion.' Among critics who conceive themselves to be 'in the movement,' it is not the present fashion to discuss Ralph Hodgson; and very little attention is paid to de la Mare, Davies, A.E. Housman, Flecker, and Blunden. Charlotte Mew, who wrote several of the best poems of the last 20 years, is never mentioned. On the other hand, G.M. Hopkins (one of the supreme poets of the 19th century) has been 'taken up'...But the names which evoke the most solemn and profuse jargon are Yeats, D.H. Lawrence, and Eliot. I have long admired all these for variant reasons and in varying degrees of enthusiasm, but I have never regarded them as being, beyond argument, the master spirits of the age in poetry..."; Galley proofs of the essay "A Poet on Poetry," [London 1935], <I>2 sheets, long narrow folio, on proofing paper, with some pencilled markings by Sassoon and with the following autograph note by him in pencil at end</I>: "(Written, by request, for <I>The Listener</I>, in 1935. Though set up, it was never published, owing to it's being a veiled attack on the modernists.)." (2) | Christie's