2 pages, 4to, integral autograph address panel with postmarks, small hole not affecting text, otherwise fine. Scott, on the brink of success as an author, postpones publication of the "Lay" due to "the pressure of the times and some other considerations...till the commencement of 1804." Writing to the illustrator Mowbray, he advises: "It will therefore be unnecessary at present to give you farther trouble than that of finishing the paintings which you have begun." He goes on to comment on the Laird of Buccleuchs golf-club, of which he doesn't "quite approve of...The game is doubtless ancient but it is also modern and by certain associations rather vulgar on a Scotchmans eye." He concludes: "If in the interum between this & next midsummer your amusement or professional engagements should bad you into this land of landscape, I hope you will favour me with a visit." The "Lay of the Last Minstrel" was eventually published in 1805, and 'succeeded at once so brilliantly as to determine Scott's future career.' (DNB -- SCOTT. Autograph letter signed ("Walter Scott") to his publisher James Ballantyne, Abbotsford, posmarked 20 October, 1825. 1 pages, 4to, integral autograph address panel, torn at seal. Despite the financial collapse of his two publishers, Constable and Ballantyne, Scott continued to work on "Woodstock" and the "Life of Napoleon Bonaparte" in the hope of paying off debts. To Ballantyne he writes: "I can get you 1500 or 2000 here...For permanent abatement my plan is thus. I have now quite finished the whole first volume of which you have great part and part of the 2nd. There must be a pause while I collect some necessary materials but the printing will proceed. Meantime I can easily go on with a tale called Woodstock...I think it will make about two vols and be out in February." Struggling to support his family, Scott continues: "My sons promotion & marriage previously cost me high last year so did the demand of house & farmland." He concludes: "I suppose it is the fall of the fund which make bankers [] their demands. You had better begin Bony as soon as you can." (2) " /> SCOTT, Walter. Autograph letter signed ("Walter Scott") to G. Mowbray, Laswade College [Scotland], 18 October 1803. <I>2 pages, 4to, integral autograph address panel with postmarks, small hole not affecting text</I>, otherwise fine. Scott, on the brink of success as an author, postpones publication of the "Lay" due to "the pressure of the times and some other considerations...till the commencement of 1804." Writing to the illustrator Mowbray, he advises: "It will therefore be unnecessary at present to give you farther trouble than that of finishing the paintings which you have begun." He goes on to comment on the Laird of Buccleuchs golf-club, of which he doesn't "quite approve of...The game is doubtless ancient but it is also modern and by certain associations rather vulgar on a Scotchmans eye." He concludes: "If in the interum between this & next midsummer your amusement or professional engagements should bad you into this land of landscape, I hope you will favour me with a visit." The "Lay of the Last Minstrel" was eventually published in 1805, and 'succeeded at once so brilliantly as to determine Scott's future career.' (DNB -- SCOTT. Autograph letter signed ("Walter Scott") to his publisher James Ballantyne, Abbotsford, posmarked 20 October, 1825. <I>1 pages, 4to, integral autograph address panel, torn at seal</I>. Despite the financial collapse of his two publishers, Constable and Ballantyne, Scott continued to work on "Woodstock" and the "Life of Napoleon Bonaparte" in the hope of paying off debts. To Ballantyne he writes: "I can get you 1500 or 2000 here...For permanent abatement my plan is thus. I have now quite finished the whole first volume of which you have great part and part of the 2nd. There must be a pause while I collect some necessary materials but the printing will proceed. Meantime I can easily go on with a tale called Woodstock...I think it will make about two vols and be out in February." Struggling to support his family, Scott continues: "My sons promotion & marriage previously cost me high last year so did the demand of house & farmland." He concludes: "I suppose it is the fall of the fund which make bankers [] their demands. You had better begin Bony as soon as you can." (2) | Christie's