, a letter written by a member of Bragg's army as he waits outside of Chattanooga, "...I wrote for you to not write any more until you heard from me, you may write direct to Chattanooga as before. We are not in Chattanooga but in sight, we are waiting for dark to charge the town. I am satisifed that we will be in possession of the town in 2 hours. I have not time to write but little for it is now dark. I have but little idea where we will be in 2 weeks the Yanks are run out of Georgia I hope they are nearly all across the River -- we will know in a short time...." -- RABB. Autograph letter signed to his wife, Near New Hope Church [Georgia], 29 May 1864, 4 pages, 8vo, a letter written in the midst of the conflict between Confederate Generals Hood and Johnston as they slow Sherman's approach on Atlanta during the final days of May, "I have heard the whistling of wild bullets etcetera until I have almost got used to them though for my life I can't possibly like the noise...I am as ever your affectionate and loving husband until time is no more." (3) " /> [SOLDIERS' LETTERS -- CONFEDERATE]. RABB, H. Autograph letter signed to his wife, Wartrace Bedford County [Tennessee], 8 June 1863, <I>2 pages, 4to</I>, a letter from a member of the Army of Tennessee, written a few weeks before the Tullahoma Campaign, "General Johnston's brigade run up with sight of their [the Federal forces] rear Guards as they run into their lines at or near Murfreesboro. We was marched some twelve or fifteen miles that time and we have had two little trips to a little town by the name of Belt Buckle some five miles towards Yankeedom...." -- RABB. Autograph letter signed to his wife, Near Chattanooga, Hamilton County [Tennessee], 23 September 1863, pages, 4to</I>, a letter written by a member of Bragg's army as he waits outside of Chattanooga, "...I wrote for you to not write any more until you heard from me, you may write direct to Chattanooga as before. We are not in Chattanooga but in sight, we are waiting for dark to charge the town. I am satisifed that we will be in possession of the town in 2 hours. I have not time to write but little for it is now dark. I have but little idea where we will be in 2 weeks the Yanks are run out of Georgia I hope they are nearly all across the River -- we will know in a short time...." -- RABB. Autograph letter signed to his wife, Near New Hope Church [Georgia], 29 May 1864, <I>4 pages, 8vo</I>, a letter written in the midst of the conflict between Confederate Generals Hood and Johnston as they slow Sherman's approach on Atlanta during the final days of May, "I have heard the whistling of wild bullets etcetera until I have almost got used to them though for my life I can't possibly like the noise...I am as ever your affectionate and loving husband until time is no more." (3) | Christie's