1 page, 8vo, personal stationery, page 1 only: "...I wish I could write something more cheerful than the War. I never expected to see such a disaster to the human race..."; TAFT. Typed letter signed as Secretary of War, to H.C. Hollister, Washington, D.C., 20 December 1904, 1 page, 4to, Secretary's stationery, smudged signature, with original envelope, explaining why an appointment cannot be made: "Ayres wanted to be an Assistant Secretary in the Department of Agriculture, but he really did not stand any chance...Wilson...had another man whom he preferred, and as the Secretary controls the appointment...Ayres was out..."; TAFT. Typed letter signed to F.P. Rand, New Haven, 2 June 1917, 1 page, personal stationery, a fine letter extolling the roles of college men in the war effort: "It has been gratifying to me to note the real patriotic spirit shown by the young men of the universities and colleges of this country. There is among them no jingo spirit, no rejoicing that we have war, only a determination to [do] their duty...Every college man worth his salt is looking about about to find a place..."; TAFT. Typed letter signed as President, to Philadelphia Mayor Rudolph Blankenburg, Washington, D.C., 26 June 1912, 1 page, 4to, integral blank, with three-line autograph postscript, "...I shall be very glad, indeed, to follow your suggestion..."; TAFT. Typed telegram as Secretary of War, to H. C. Hollister, Washington, D.C., 22 December 1904, an oblong, with original envelope: "Did you get Harry Hoyts letter and have you reached a conclusion..."; TAFT. Partly printed document signed as Secretary of War, to Howard C. Hollister, n.p., n.d. [1904], an oblong, accomplished in manuscript, in pencil, Taft sends a telegram, declining to "comply with your suggestion..."; TAFT. Partly printed document signed in typescript as President, to the same, Washington, D.C., 3 March 1911, an oblong, soiled, inviting Hollister to the White House; together 7 items. (7) " /> TAFT, WILLIAM HOWARD, <I>President</I>. Typed letter signed as President, to Philadelphia Mayor Rudolph Blankenburg, with a three-line autograph postscript, Washington, D.C., 26 June 1912, <I>1 page, 4to, integral blank,</I> regarding his forthcoming visit to Philadelphia, agreeing to keep it "informal," and adding in a postscript that the first lady "loves music and will accompany me unless there is some objection..."; TAFT. Fragmentary autograph letter to "My dear Frank," Pointe au Pie, 21 September 1914, <I>1 page, 8vo, personal stationery</I>, page 1 only: "...I wish I could write something more cheerful than the War. I never expected to see such a disaster to the human race..."; TAFT. Typed letter signed as Secretary of War, to H.C. Hollister, Washington, D.C., 20 December 1904, <I>1 page, 4to, Secretary's stationery, smudged signature, with original envelope</I>, explaining why an appointment cannot be made: "Ayres wanted to be an Assistant Secretary in the Department of Agriculture, but he really did not stand any chance...Wilson...had another man whom he preferred, and as the Secretary controls the appointment...Ayres was out..."; TAFT. Typed letter signed to F.P. Rand, New Haven, 2 June 1917, <I>1 page, personal stationery,</I> a fine letter extolling the roles of college men in the war effort: "It has been gratifying to me to note the real patriotic spirit shown by the young men of the universities and colleges of this country. There is among them no jingo spirit, no rejoicing that we have war, only a determination to [do] their duty...Every college man worth his salt is looking about about to find a place..."; TAFT. Typed letter signed as President, to Philadelphia Mayor Rudolph Blankenburg, Washington, D.C., 26 June 1912, <I>1 page, 4to, integral blank, with three-line autograph postscript,</I> "...I shall be very glad, indeed, to follow your suggestion..."; TAFT. Typed telegram as Secretary of War, to H. C. Hollister, Washington, D.C., 22 December 1904, <I>an oblong, with original envelope</I>: "Did you get Harry Hoyts letter and have you reached a conclusion..."; TAFT. Partly printed document signed as Secretary of War, to Howard C. Hollister, n.p., n.d. [1904], <I>an oblong, accomplished in manuscript, in pencil</I>, Taft sends a telegram, declining to "comply with your suggestion..."; TAFT. Partly printed document signed in typescript as President, to the same, Washington, D.C., 3 March 1911, <I>an oblong, soiled</I>, inviting Hollister to the White House; <I>together 7 items</I>. (7) | Christie's