Provenance: Thomas Lauth, eighteenth-century engraved bookplate (cancelled in ink) -- Presentation inscription in pencil from a Professor Braunig[?] to Capt. Greenhill, Christmas 1947. " /> TAGLIACOZZI, GASPARE. De Curtorum Chirurgia per insitionem Libri duo... Additis Cutis Traducis instrumentorum omnium, atque deligationum Iconibus, & Tabulis. Venice: Gaspar Bindoni junior 1597. <I>Folio, 291 x 205 mm. (11 1/2 x 8 1/4 in.), eighteenth-century sheep-backed boards, edges stained red, upper cover detached, crudely repaired with scotch tape, engraved title cropped at upper edge, with old repairs at inner margin and small tears along fold, small stain obscuring a letter of imprint, engraved and printed titles slightly soiled, occasional marginal foxing, fols. Ddd3-5 a bit more heavily foxed, a few leaves darkened</I>. FIRST EDITION, second issue, with the imprimatur on verso of title, 3 parts in one, separately paginated, additional engraved architectural title (folding in this copy), the arms of the dedicatee Vincenzo Gonzago, Duke of Mantua at top, the figures of Hippocrates and Galen at sides, letterpress title in red and black with woodcut printer's device, two small woodcuts on page 57 in part 2, part 3 consisting of 22 full-page woodcuts with printed keys on facing pages, illustrating surgical instruments, various post-operative stages of plastic surgery, and bandaging techniques, woodcut and type ornament head and tail-pieces, woodcut initials. NLM/Durling 4310; Garrison and Morton 5734; Harvard/Mortimer <I>Italian</I> 488; Norman 2048. THE FIRST BOOK EXCLUSIVELY DEVOTED TO PLASTIC SURGERY. "Although many earlier writers...had discussed aspects of plastic operations, Tagliacozzi [(1545-1599), successor to Guilio Cesare Aranzio in the chair of anatomy at Bologna] was the first to work toward establishing their scientific validity by publishing surgical procedures that had for generations been closely guarded secrets, and by improving these procedures in the light of the best medical knowledge of his day. Tagliacozzi described and fully illustrated the method of rhinoplasty that uses a graft from the patient's arm, as well as various cosmetic operations on the ears, yet his contemporaries refused to adopt his methods, possibly for fear of complications, or possibly because the Catholic Church regarded plastic operations as meddling with the work of God (after Tagliacozzi's death, the Church had his body exhumed and reburied in unconsecrated ground). Tagliacozzi's work remained virtually forgotten until the revival of plastic surgery by Joseph Contamine Carpue and Carl Ferdinand von Graefe in the early nineteenth century"--Norman. <I>Provenance</I>: Thomas Lauth, eighteenth-century engraved bookplate (cancelled in ink) -- Presentation inscription in pencil from a Professor Braunig[?] to Capt. Greenhill, Christmas 1947. | Christie's