Odes and Ecologues] you have sent me. I had already seen Swinburne's copy and read it with real delight..."; Autograph letter signed to the author Jean Ingelow, 30 October 1886, 4 pages, 8vo, on black-bordered mourning stationery, some soiling, two small tears. A letter of condolence on a death in Ingelow's family: "...You who have said so many beautiful things upon the mystery and wonders of life and death can be told nothing that you do not know far more deeply than I. The fragility of human life is beginning to overwhelm me..."; Autograph lettter signed to the author Edward Clodd, 15 February 1893, 1 1/2 pages, 8vo, complaining that he had not been invited to join a testamonial to Sir Walter Besant: "...You know that I am an enthusiastic admirer of Besant...why was I left out in the cold?"; Autograph letter signed TO RICHARD LE GALLIENNE, 9 August 1894, 4 pages, 8vo, traces of mounting, regarding reviews of Le Gallienne's Prose Fancies: "...I gathered from Mr. [John] Lane [the book's publisher] that you think, rightly or wrongly, that The Athenaeum is unfriendly to you...As a matter of fact I rarely ever read the reviews in The Athenaeum unless I write them, which is only occasionally now. I intend to leave reviewing altogether. It is work that has nearly turned me from an optimist into a cynic. The very meanest sides of human nature display themselves to a reviewer"; together 4 letters, 11 1/2 pages, all signed "Theodore Watts" (he added "Dunton" to his surname in 1896), all from The Pines, Putney Hill, London. (4) " /> WATTS-DUNTON, THEODORE. Autograph letter signed to the poet Canon Richard Watson Dixon, 11 April 1884, <I>2 pages, 8vo, with envelope</I>: "Please accept my sincere and warm thanks for the lovely little present [a copy of Dixon's <I>Odes and Ecologues</I>] you have sent me. I had already seen Swinburne's copy and read it with real delight..."; Autograph letter signed to the author Jean Ingelow, 30 October 1886, <I>4 pages, 8vo, on black-bordered mourning stationery, some soiling, two small tears</I>. A letter of condolence on a death in Ingelow's family: "...You who have said so many beautiful things upon the mystery and wonders of life and death can be told nothing that you do not know far more deeply than I. The fragility of human life is beginning to overwhelm me..."; Autograph lettter signed to the author Edward Clodd, 15 February 1893, <I>1 1/2 pages, 8vo</I>, complaining that he had not been invited to join a testamonial to Sir Walter Besant: "...You know that I am an enthusiastic admirer of Besant...why was I left out in the cold?"; Autograph letter signed TO RICHARD LE GALLIENNE, 9 August 1894, <I>4 pages, 8vo, traces of mounting</I>, regarding reviews of Le Gallienne's <I>Prose Fancies</I>: "...I gathered from Mr. [John] Lane [the book's publisher] that you think, rightly or wrongly, that <I>The Athenaeum</I> is unfriendly to you...As a matter of fact I rarely ever read the reviews in <I>The Athenaeum</I> unless I write them, which is only occasionally now. I intend to leave reviewing altogether. It is work that has nearly turned me from an optimist into a cynic. The very meanest sides of human nature display themselves to a reviewer"; <I>together 4 letters, 11 1/2 pages</I>, all signed "Theodore Watts" (he added "Dunton" to his surname in 1896), all from The Pines, Putney Hill, London. (4) | Christie's