1 page, folio, fold tear. Lee (1731-1782) thanks Morris for sending a draftsman, commenting that "we want able people in the Martial way," that the American posts around Winter Hill seem to be getting stronger every day, while "the Enemy seem every day more apprehensive," and adding in a postscript: "We sent in yesterday a most curious message to [British General] Gage, but I cannot give you a copy without G. Washington's consent..." -- LEE. Autograph letter signed ("Charles Lee") TO ROBERT MORRIS, Virginia, 20 July 1782, 4 pages, 4to, separate address leaf, docketed by Morris. Lee, disgraced at the Battle of Monmouth (1778), removed from command and dismissed from the Army in 1780, writes regarding the sale of his Berkely County (now West Virigina) estate, noting the state's inability to collect taxes, then complains of the failure of the Continental Congress to make peace with England, since, if France takes Britain's holdings in the Indies, they would become the new aggressor towards the United States. Together 2 items. (2) " /> LEE, CHARLES, <I>General, Continental Army, traitor</I>. Autograph letter signed ("Charles Lee") TO ROBERT MORRIS, Winter Hill [camp near Boston], 12 August 1775, <I>1 page, folio, fold tear</I>. Lee (1731-1782) thanks Morris for sending a draftsman, commenting that "we want able people in the Martial way," that the American posts around Winter Hill seem to be getting stronger every day, while "the Enemy seem every day more apprehensive," and adding in a postscript: "We sent in yesterday a most curious message to [British General] Gage, but I cannot give you a copy without G. Washington's consent..." -- LEE. Autograph letter signed ("Charles Lee") TO ROBERT MORRIS, Virginia, 20 July 1782, <I>4 pages, 4to, separate address leaf, docketed by Morris.</I> Lee, disgraced at the Battle of Monmouth (1778), removed from command and dismissed from the Army in 1780, writes regarding the sale of his Berkely County (now West Virigina) estate, noting the state's inability to collect taxes, then complains of the failure of the Continental Congress to make peace with England, since, if France takes Britain's holdings in the Indies, they would become the new aggressor towards the United States. <I>Together 2 items</I>. (2) | Christie's