3 full pages, folio, address panel on page 4, fine condition, in French, A REVEALING POLITICAL LETTER WRITTEN JUST BEFORE THE THIRD WAR OF RELIGION., clearly defining his policy of using armed force to subdue the Protestants and speculating on Philip II's military plans (the Netherlands were in open revolt against Spanish rule). To his Ambassador, the King describes the defeat of the Protestant army under Coqueville by the Marchal de Coss in Picardy, and expresses the hope that this disaster will inspire fear in those who unite to defy his edict. The "punishments [torture] inflicted upon the prisoners will be a warning to others," and it should be made widely known that all rebels will be similarly treated. "After having carefully considered the best way...of keeping each one to his duty, it seemed to me, and I am well advised, that it must be accomplished by force, which...will serve to chastize and punish those who violate my wishes and also to prevent such calamities from falling upon us again, especially since those who have suffered most in the past troubles have been my poor people. I have decided that for their relief, the best things was to seek help from a well-paid police force; these will maintain the garrisons and will be able to care for the poor people..." He has sent the Marechal de Vielleville against the citadel of La Rochelle and the discusses at length the military plans of Philip II. -- MEDICI, CATHERINE DE (1519-1589), Mother of Charles IX. Letter signed ("Caterine") to Guy Chabot, Baron de Jarnac, Governor of La Rochelle and Mayor of Bordeaux. Paris, 16 August 1567. 1 page, folio, in French. PROTESTANT VERSUS CATHOLIC Interesting letter written during the Second War of Religion, regarding the Protestant stronghold of La Rochelle. Catherine writes that the Protestants there "have been under suspicion that they have been fooled," and asks that Chabot "make a tour as far as La Rochelle, to reassure them and make them cease their defiance. As for the outcry that...they like to make, they will vanish, being full of sound and fury and it will be necessary for those who are so agitated by such slight reasons to calm themselves and be wise..." Together two items. The Wars of Religion--a virtual Civil war between Catholics and Huguenots--raged from 1562 on, relieved by uneasy truces and culminating in 1572 in the Massacre of St. Bartholomew, authorized by Charles (1550-1574) who had been from an early age under the almost complete domination of his mother Catherine, consort of Henry II. Diplomatic letters of such significant content are unusual. Fourquevaux, an experienced diplomat and soldier, had been appointed ambassador to the Spanish court in 1565 and served there until his death. (2) " /> [FRANCE, SOVEREIGNS]. CHARLES IX. Letter signed ("Charles") to FRANOIS PAVIE, BARON DE FOURQUEVAUX, Ambassador to Spain (1509-1574), Chateau de Boullongue, 29 July 1568, <I>3 full pages, folio, address panel on page 4,</I> fine condition, in French, A REVEALING POLITICAL LETTER WRITTEN JUST BEFORE THE THIRD WAR OF RELIGION., clearly defining his policy of using armed force to subdue the Protestants and speculating on Philip II's military plans (the Netherlands were in open revolt against Spanish rule). To his Ambassador, the King describes the defeat of the Protestant army under Coqueville by the Marchal de Coss in Picardy, and expresses the hope that this disaster will inspire fear in those who unite to defy his edict. The "punishments [torture] inflicted upon the prisoners will be a warning to others," and it should be made widely known that all rebels will be similarly treated. "After having carefully considered the best way...of keeping each one to his duty, it seemed to me, and I am well advised, that it must be accomplished by force, which...will serve to chastize and punish those who violate my wishes and also to prevent such calamities from falling upon us again, especially since those who have suffered most in the past troubles have been my poor people. I have decided that for their relief, the best things was to seek help from a well-paid police force; these will maintain the garrisons and will be able to care for the poor people..." He has sent the Marechal de Vielleville against the citadel of La Rochelle and the discusses at length the military plans of Philip II. -- MEDICI, CATHERINE DE (1519-1589), <I>Mother of Charles IX</I>. Letter signed ("Caterine") to Guy Chabot, Baron de Jarnac, Governor of La Rochelle and Mayor of Bordeaux. Paris, 16 August 1567. <I>1 page, folio,</I> in French. PROTESTANT VERSUS CATHOLIC Interesting letter written during the Second War of Religion, regarding the Protestant stronghold of La Rochelle. Catherine writes that the Protestants there "have been under suspicion that they have been fooled," and asks that Chabot "make a tour as far as La Rochelle, to reassure them and make them cease their defiance. As for the outcry that...they like to make, they will vanish, being full of sound and fury and it will be necessary for those who are so agitated by such slight reasons to calm themselves and be wise..." <I>Together two items. </I> The Wars of Religion--a virtual Civil war between Catholics and Huguenots--raged from 1562 on, relieved by uneasy truces and culminating in 1572 in the Massacre of St. Bartholomew, authorized by Charles (1550-1574) who had been from an early age under the almost complete domination of his mother Catherine, consort of Henry II. Diplomatic letters of such significant content are unusual. Fourquevaux, an experienced diplomat and soldier, had been appointed ambassador to the Spanish court in 1565 and served there until his death. (2) | Christie's