Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919)
Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919)

Jeune femme assise dans une barque

Details
Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919)
Jeune femme assise dans une barque
signed 'Renoir.' (lower right)
oil on canvas
14 x 18 in. (37.5 x 45.7 cm.)
Provenance
Galerie Mouradian-Vallotton, Paris.
Anon. sale, Sotheby's, New York, 11 May 1987, lot 30.

Lot Essay

In her journal Julie Manet described the help and painterly advice Renoir gave her during the late 80s: "I went to work with M. Renoir and, after searching for a sheltered spot for about an hour, we ended up back at the river. M. Renoir advised me not to place the horizon line too high in a painting but rather in the middle, this being the point that attracts the attention. Also, not to start the foreground too close to one. He showed me how the river appeared to flow and to vanish among the trees at the back more convincingly, when they were placed in the middle of the canvas rather than high up, as I had placed them. Then he said that I should paint very lightly to start with" (J. Manet, Journal, 1883-1899, Paris, n.d.).

Around 1900 the patterns of Renoir's life changed again: from then until the end of his life he and his family spent long periods each winter and spring on the Mediterranean coast and much of the summer at Essoyes, where they owned a house, with only limited spells in Paris. From 1903, when they went to the South, they always went to Cagnes, just West of Nice, where, in 1907, they bought land and began to build a house. The immediate reason for these changes was Renoir's health, but they reflected a more general change in his art, towards the Classicism of the Mediterranean and, more particularly, towards ideas then associated with the revival of Provenal culture.

The late Franois Daulte confirmed the authenticity of this painting.
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