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A GEORGE II GILTWOOD MIRROR
THE PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR (Lots 159-165)
A GEORGE II GILTWOOD MIRROR

CIRCA 1755

Details
A GEORGE II GILTWOOD MIRROR
Circa 1755
The arched divided rectangular plate with leafy branch divide, flanked by outer slips with vine-wrapped fluted and angled pilasters, beneath an inswept overhanging entre-lac cresting with perched phoenix above a central ruffled acanthus shell clasp, further flanked to each side with an outer mirrored slip with foliate branch entwined lower steps with balustrades and urns, fluted angled pilasters, the cartouche central lower slip with rocaille C-scroll, acanthus and bullrush surround, the top plate bevelled and probably reused from an early 18th century mirror
101½in. (258cm.) high, 60½in. (153.5cm.) wide
Provenance
Anonymous sale, Sotheby's London, 16 November 1984, lot 101 (£20,900)
Literature
G. Child, World Mirrors 1650-1900, London, 1990, p.118, pl. 156.

Lot Essay

The combination of Chinese, Rococo and Gothic influences in this mirror relates it most closely to the designs of John Linnell, the drawing for which is in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (reproduced here). A further design for a table base commisioned by John Sanderson, between 1747-1752 for the Foundling Hospital, London, bears close resemblance to the offered mirror in the treatment of the branches with heavy leaves.

Many of Linnell's motifs such as the use of eagles, putti, chinamen and branches of trees with heavy leaves are derived from the ornamental engravings by French artisans such as Jean Bérain, Daniel Marot, Nicholas Pineau and Juste-Aurele Meissonnier. These designs were available to English craftsmen and artists at the St. Martin's Lane Academy and other London drawing schools.

William Linnell, became a senior member of the Joiner's Company in 1729, the same year that his son and future partner John was born. Both father and son worked together until William's death in 1763, by which time the flourishing company employed some forty to fifty people.
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