ENIAC, EDVAC, UNIVAC: Universal automatic computer. [Philadelphia: Electronic Control Co,] n.d. [1947].
The Origins of Cyberspace collection described as lots 1-255 will first be offered as a single lot, subject to a reserve price. If this price is not reached, the collection will be immediately offered as individual lots as described in the catalogue as lots 1-255.
ENIAC, EDVAC, UNIVAC: Universal automatic computer. [Philadelphia: Electronic Control Co,] n.d. [1947].

Details
ENIAC, EDVAC, UNIVAC: Universal automatic computer. [Philadelphia: Electronic Control Co,] n.d. [1947].

4o. 12 pages. Text illustrations. Original printed self-wrappers.

THE FIRST SALES BROCHURE EVER PUBLISHED FOR AN ELECTRONIC DIGITAL COMPUTER. Selling the concept of a radically new and very expensive machine that did not exist would have challenged any marketing whiz. Eckert and Mauchly's approach was to explain how UNIVAC had evolved out of the ENIAC, and the EDVAC which was then also under development. In the brochure they rightly took credit for much of the design of the ENIAC, and for the planning of the EDVAC before they left the University of Pennsylvania. The brochure suggested that the EDVAC was in existence at the time, though it was just in developmental stages, hardly much further along than UNIVAC. The brochure explained that EDVAC would be much faster than ENIAC, and UNIVAC would be far faster than EDVAC. The brochure contained an overview of the plans for UNIVAC, but most of it was given over to a reprint of Douglas Hartree's "The ENIAC, an electronic computing machine". That authoritative illustrated article published in Nature described the ENIAC and summarized its operations, adding authority to this brochure from a virtually unknown start-up company. Throughout the brochure the team is referred to as Mauchly and Eckert, perhaps reflecting Mauchly's seniority to Eckert who was then only twenty-eight. Featuring the vacuum tube prominently on the cover of the brochure emphasized the then-advanced feature of using vacuum tubes as switches instead of electromechanical relays. This is the first issue of the brochure, with "Electronic Control Co, 1215 Walnut St, Phila, Pa." at the foot of page 3; a later issue, described in Randell, has this information overprinted with the name and address of the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation, Eckert's second business entity. Randell 1982a, 540. When OOC was written, OCLC cited no copies of this brochure; RLIN cited only the copy at the University of Pennsylvania. OOC 1133.
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