Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
AN EGYPTIAN PAINTED POTTERY AMPHORA
AN EGYPTIAN PAINTED POTTERY AMPHORA

NEW KINGDOM, DYNASTY XVIII, REIGN OF AKHENATEN, 1353-1335 B.C.

Details
AN EGYPTIAN PAINTED POTTERY AMPHORA
NEW KINGDOM, DYNASTY XVIII, REIGN OF AKHENATEN, 1353-1335 B.C.
The wheel-thrown vessel ovoid in form with a conical neck, the strap handles rising up from the shoulders and merging with the flaring rim, the zones between the handles and neck each filled with an openwork ankh, the shoulders and neck ornamented with a gazelle running amidst a foliate ground, the outline of its body incised, the neck and frontal head applied, the body painted blue with details of the eyes and muzzle in black, the ears red, an applied band of tongues above, the scene framed and interspersed by decorative bands in blue, red and black
11 in. (27.9 cm.) high
Provenance
Georges Halphen; Drouot-Richelieu, Paris, 8 December 1995, lot 180.
with Charles Ede Ltd, London, May 1996 (Antiquities, Catalogue 162, no. 5).
Literature
R.E. Freed, Y.J. Markowitz, S.H. D'Auria, eds., Exhibition catalogue, Pharaohs of the Sun: Akhenaten, Nefertiti, Tutankhamen, Boston, 1999, no. 103, p. 236.
Exhibited
Boston, Museum of Fine Arts and elsewhere, Pharaohs of the Sun: Akhenaten, Nefertiti, Tutankhamen, 14 November 1999-6 February 2001.
San Bernardino, Robert V. Fullerton Art Museum, periodically until August 2005.

Lot Essay

Pottery vessels painted in powdered blue pigment make their appearance during the mid Eighteenth Dynasty. According to Lacovara (p. 236 in Freed, Markowitz, D'Auria, eds., op. cit.) the pigment was derived either from cobalt deposits in the desert oases or from imported glass ingots that were ground down. Vessels decorated with human, animal and plant forms are depicted in tomb scenes, and although these were likely of metal, they inspired the more humble pottery versions. Lacovara further explains that the young gazelle and the ankh "were associated with rebirth and rejuvenation, a theme that continued to be popular during the Amarna period."
;

More from ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ART FROM THE HARER FAMILY TRUST COLLECTION

View All
View All