search

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
AMELIE D'AUBIGNY, NEE D'AUTEL (FRENCH, 1795/96 - 1861)
Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
AMELIE D'AUBIGNY, NEE D'AUTEL (FRENCH, 1795/96 - 1861)

Details
AMELIE D'AUBIGNY, NEE D'AUTEL (FRENCH, 1795/96 - 1861)
Marie Thérèse Charlotte of France (1778-1851), Duchesse d'Angoulême, in white lace-bordered dark green dress, pearl-set waistband, wearing pearl necklace, earring and pearls in her upswept fair hair dressed in ringlets, adorned with ostrich plumes and white lace veil; interior background with mauve curtain and pillar
signed 'Alie Dtel' (mid-right)
on ivory
oval, 3 7/16 in. (87 mm.) high, rectangular ormolu frame with acanthus surmount, the corners applied with gilt acanthus leaves and foliate scrolls
A paper label on the reverse is inscribed in pen with biographical information about the sitter.
Provenance
Bequeathed by the Marquise Douairière de Louvois (d. 1822) to the Marquise de Montaigu.
Sotheby's, Monte Carlo, 25 June 1976, lot 397.
Robert D. Brewster (1916-1995) Collection, New York; Sotheby's, Geneva, 15 November 1995, lot 338.
Special notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

Brought to you by

Matilda Burn
Matilda Burn

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Marie Thérèse Charlotte, Madame Royale, was the eldest daughter of King Louis XVI of France and Queen Marie Antoinette. She married her cousin, Louis Antoine, Duc d'Angoulême, eldest son of the future king, Charles X. Upon the accession of her father-in-law to the throne in 1824 she became the Dauphine of France. Her reign as Queen of France in 1830 is recorded to have lasted twenty minutes: between the time her father-in-law, Charles X, signed the instrument of abdication and the time her husband signed the same document.

More from Centuries of Style: Silver, European Ceramics, Portrait Miniatures and Gold Boxes

View All
View All