IMPORTANT THANGKA REPRESENTANT LE PANCHEN LAMA BLO.BZANG.DPAL.LDAN.YE.SHES.ZHABS (1737-1780) EN SOIE BRODEE
THE PROPERTY OF AN ENGLISH COLLECTOR
IMPORTANT THANGKA REPRESENTANT LE PANCHEN LAMA BLO.BZANG.DPAL.LDAN.YE.SHES.ZHABS (1737-1780) EN SOIE BRODEE

CHINE, DYNASTIE QING, XIXEME SIECLE

Details
IMPORTANT THANGKA REPRESENTANT LE PANCHEN LAMA BLO.BZANG.DPAL.LDAN.YE.SHES.ZHABS (1737-1780) EN SOIE BRODEE
CHINE, DYNASTIE QING, XIXEME SIECLE
The Panchen Lama is shown seated in relaxed posture on a double cushion placed on an elaborate throne. His right hand is making the instruction gesture while the left supports a bowl containing offerings. He is dressed in monks robes. Behind him are placed the large container, mendicant staff and stupa supported by a stand and to his front an altar table with offerings. The upper register displays Syamatara flanked by Yamantaka and a lama. The lower section contains Shri Devi flanked by Caturbhujamahakala and a protective divinity. The central scene is placed in a mountainous landscape. Set in a brocade mounting, bottom rod with enamelled knobs.
27 x 16 in. (68.5 x 41 cm.)
Provenance
Given to the mother of the present owner in 1954 by a high lama from the Tashilhunpo monastery
Post lot text
AN IMPORTANT SILK EMBROIDERED THANGKA DEPICTING THE PANCHEN LAMA BLO.BZANG.DPAL.LDAN.YE.SHES.ZHABS (1737-1780)
CHINA, QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY

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Fiona Braslau
Fiona Braslau

Lot Essay

This extremely finely embroidered thangka or scroll in silk is one that belongs to a larger series depicting each a Panchen Lama or the principle lama of the Tashilunpo monastery located in Shigatse. He belongs to the Gelukpa or Yellow order and is seen as second in religious line to the Dalai Lama. The presented Panchen Lama (1737-1780) is the third in lineage and contemporary to the seventh Dalai Lama who is most likely depicted above him to its left side.
The embroidery style of the scroll is Chinese, including its mounting and enamelled knobs. It was embroidered in an atelier most likely in or around Beijing as gift to a high pontiff of the Tashilunpo monastery. The iconography of the various protective deities however is of Tibetan origin.

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