A GEORGE III SILVER TWO-LIGHT CANDELABRUM
THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN
A GEORGE III SILVER TWO-LIGHT CANDELABRUM

MARK OF JOHN WAKELIN AND ROBERT GARRARD, LONDON, 1810

Details
A GEORGE III SILVER TWO-LIGHT CANDELABRUM
MARK OF JOHN WAKELIN AND ROBERT GARRARD, LONDON, 1810
On circular base, the baluster stem and base entirely cast and chased with swirling flutes, the similarly chased branches with plain wax pans and detachable short reed and-tie cast nozzles, with central cast flame finials, the sockets engraved with a crest below viscount's coronet, marked on base, branches, finial and sockets, the bases engraved with scratchweight 'No. 3 90=5'
17 1/4 in. (44 cm.) high
90 oz. 3 dwt. (2,804 gr.)
The crest is that of Dawson for Thomas Dawson, 1st Baron Cremorne, later 1st Viscount Cremorne (1725-1813).
Provenance
Commissioned by Thomas Dawson, 1st Viscount Cremorne (1725-1813), from John Wakelin and Robert Garrard to match a set delivered on 21 May 1791 and 21 December 1791, then by descent to his great-nephew
Richard Thomas, 2nd Baron Cremorne (1788-1827), then by descent.
Sale room notice
The date of the sockets is 1802.

Brought to you by

Dido Penny
Dido Penny

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Thomas Dawson, 1st Viscount Cremorne (1725-1813)

Thomas Dawson was the first surviving son of Richard Dawson (d.1766) of Dawson Grove and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Vesey, Archbishop of Tuam. The 18th century wealth of the family was made by his father, the banker Alderman Richard Dawson (d.1766). Thomas, 1st Viscount Cremorne was able to pursue a long political career, acquire a number of titles and commission houses in Ireland and London. He was a patron of the architect James Wyatt and the artists Thomas Lawrence and Johann Zoffany. Dawson was M.P. co. Monaghan and was raised to the Irish House of Lords as Baron Dartrey of Dawson’s Grove in 1770 Viscount Cremorne in 1785. The death of his first wife must have greatly affected him as he commissioned James Wyatt (1746-1813) to raise a magnificent mausoleum in her memory. It enclosed a sculpture by Joseph Wilton (1722-1803).

Cremorne enlarged his Chelsea villa, Cremorne House employing James Wyatt and the landscape gardener and surveyor Nathaniel Richmond (1723-1784). It was here and at his Mayfair house that he was visited by King George III, Queen Charlotte and the Prince of Wales on numerous occasions. Lord Cremorne’s second wife, Philadelphia (1740-1826), daughter of Thomas Freame and grand-daughter of William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania, was a lady-in-waiting to the Queen. Lord Uxbridge, who commissioned a set of four matching candelabra in 1792, possibly admired the original Cremorne pair at a dinner or soirée at Cremorne House. This could explain the entry for Lord Uxbridge’s candelabra in the silversmiths’ ledgers which describe them as being ‘like Cremornes’.

More from OPULENCE .Silver . Gold Boxes . 19th Century Furniture & Works of Art

View All
View All