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AN ISFAHAN CARPET
AN ISFAHAN CARPET
AN ISFAHAN CARPET
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AN ISFAHAN CARPET
6 More
Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a fill… Read more
AN ISFAHAN CARPET

SIGNED HEKMATNEJAD, CENTRAL PERSIA, CIRCA 1940

Details
AN ISFAHAN CARPET
SIGNED HEKMATNEJAD, CENTRAL PERSIA, CIRCA 1940
Finely woven, full pile throughout, silk warps, overall excellent condition
12ft.9in. x 9ft.8in. (394cm. x 300cm.)
Special Notice

Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square ( ¦ ) not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crown Fine Art (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent ofsite. If the lot is transferred to Crown Fine Art, it will be available for collection from 12.00 pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crown Fine Art. All collections from Crown Fine Art will be by prebooked appointment only.

Brought to you by

Louise Broadhurst
Louise Broadhurst International Head of Department Oriental Rugs and Carpets

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Condition Report

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Lot Essay

The knot count is approximately 11H x 11V per cm. sq.

The inscription cartouche reads; baft Iran Isfahan Hekmatnejad (Majnouni); Woven in Isfahan by Hekmatnejad, (Majnouni).

Another master weaver producing carpets at the same time as the Seirafian workshop in Isfahan was Dr. Hekmatnejad who was equally respected and boasted the same popularity. These 20th century, finely woven, works of art by master weavers such as Haghighi, Amoghli and Seirafian were highly regarded by the last of the ruling shahs of Iran and it was with these pieces, not the earlier Safavid classical carpets, with which they chose to decorate their numerous palaces. Indeed this has always been the case. Sigismund Vasa, King of Poland, did not send his Armenian emissary to Kashan at the end of the 16th century to buy old carpets, but to commission new ones, some with his coat-of-arms inter-woven, as seen in the following two lots in the present sale.
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