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AFTERNOON SESSION AT 2:00 P.M. PRECISELY (LOTS 193-384) TANG, SONG AND YUAN WARES VARIOUS PROPERTIES
A PHOSPHATIC-SPLASHED GLAZED STONEWARE EWER

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A PHOSPHATIC-SPLASHED GLAZED STONEWARE EWER
TANG DYNASTY

Of ovoid form, liberally splashed under the double-strap handle, short conical spout and each of the double-strap lugs flanking the neck with an opaque glaze of creamy white color pooling in heavy droplets and shading to cobalt blue where it thins against the dark brown glaze which ends in an irregular line above the grooved foot rim to expose the fine-grained ware, with smaller phosphatic splashes on the neck below the unglazed rim--11in. (28cm.) high, box

Lot Essay

Splashed glazed wares were made in the Tang Dynasty primarily in Henan province, where several kilns that produced them have been found. The earliest discoveries were the kilns at Huangdao in Jiaxian, for which these wares are often named. Other kiln sites have since been excavated in Lushan, Neixiang, and Yuxian in Henan and also in the area of Jiaocheng, Shanxi province. See Feng Xianming et al., Zhongguo taocishi (History of Chinese ceramics), (Beijing: Wenwu Press, 1982), p. 213

Frequently seen among this group of wares are jars, some of impressive size, on which the black or dark brown glaze stops short of the base. The bluish or yellowish white splashes are applied after glazing, often poured onto the pot held in a sideways or an inverted position

Compare examples in the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Newark Museum, Jennifer Neils, ed., The World of Ceramics--Masterpieces from the Cleveland Museum of Art (Cleveland, 1982), no. 95; and Valrae Reynolds et al. "2000 Years of Chinese Ceramics--The Newark Museum Collection", The Newark Museum Quarterly (1977), 28:3/4, cover
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