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A Victorian silver-gilt and shagreen perpetual calendar travel timepiece with moonphase
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A Victorian silver-gilt and shagreen perpetual calendar travel timepiece with moonphase

JUMP, LONDON, NO.2925. DATED 1898

Details
A Victorian silver-gilt and shagreen perpetual calendar travel timepiece with moonphase
Jump, London, No.2925. Dated 1898
The hump-back case on silver-gilt bun feet and with silver-gilt mouldings, with glazed front panel and sliding rear door with shuttered hand-set and winding apertures and engraved AD 1898 on the reverse, the arched gilt-brass engine-turned mask with milled bezels to silver chapter discs, the engine-turned silver main dial with eccentric Roman chapter ring with gold Breguet style hands, lunette aperture above with gilt and blued steel revolving moonphase, signed JUMP LONDON on two small rectangular reserves, with subsidiary engine-turned silver dials beneath for day and date and blued steel arrow-head hands, flanking a rectangular aperture showing the month on a revolving drum, the single chain fusee four pillar movement with arched plates, cut-away deeply at the top to accommodate the high quality gilt platform for the lever escapement with cut bimetallic balance, with jewelled contrate wheel, maintaining power, the back plate signed Jump and with punched number 2925 to the front plate
6in. (15cm.) high
Provenance
The Currie Collection, 1 Richmond Terrace, Whitehall, London; thence by descent. Purchased from Jump in 1904 for £115.
Literature
Catalogue of the Collection of Works of Art, &c, At 1 Richmond Terrace, Whitehall, printed for private circulation by Arthur L. Humphreys, 187 Piccadilly W., 1909, p.52. The clock illustrated in a photograph on the dining room chimney piece.
Special Notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.

Lot Essay

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE:
Charles Allix and Peter Bonnert, Carriage Clocks, Antique Collectors' Club, 1974, pp.289-291.

Richard Thomas Jump (b.1785) joined the workshop of Benjamin Louis Vulliamy in 1812. Two of his sons, Richard Thomas and Joseph, were apprenticed to Vulliamy in 1825 and 1827 respectively, remaining with him until his death in 1854. In 1855 Joseph Jump and another brother, Alfred, set up in business as successors to Vulliamy at 1a Old Bond Street. Subsequently they were joined by Joseph's son, Henry Joseph. Alfred died in 1872. Joseph and Henry Joseph were in turn joined by the latter's son, Henry Percival in 1875.
In 1880 the firm moved to 55 Pall Mall. It was here, circa 1883 that they made the first of their famous hump-back carriage clocks. Arthur Hayton Jump (who joined in 1897) later wrote of this: 'The first of these clocks was made for a Lord Ashburton...It cost the firm a load of money in time and trouble, for so many men had to make so many parts (the man that made the hands couldn't do anything else etc., etc.) My father presented the bill to Lord A with trembling hands...Lord A took the bill and wrote out a cheque at once for double the amount charged on the bill!!!'(Charles Allix and Peter Bonnert, Carriage Clocks, Antique Collectors' Club, 1974, p.290.) In 1898 the firm moved to Mount Street, where it stayed until it ceased trading in 1934.
Amongst the finest carriage clocks ever produced, 'hump-back' carriage clocks were originally inspired by the great French clock and watchmaker Abraham-Louis Breguet (1747-1823).
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