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AN IMPORTANT PAIR OF GEORGE III IRISH SILVER SOUP-TUREENS AND COVERS
THE PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR
AN IMPORTANT PAIR OF GEORGE III IRISH SILVER SOUP-TUREENS AND COVERS

MARK OF ROBERT BREADING, DUBLIN, 1799

Details
AN IMPORTANT PAIR OF GEORGE III IRISH SILVER SOUP-TUREENS AND COVERS
MARK OF ROBERT BREADING, DUBLIN, 1799
Each navette-shaped on spreading foot, with two reeded scroll handles, the detachable cover with cast vase-shaped finial, the foot, border and cover each engraved with a band of foliage, each side further engraved with an inscription, the cover engraved with a coat-of-arms, marked under foot and on cover bezel, further marked with a later French tax mark
19½ in. (49.5 cm.) wide over handles
217 oz. (6,744 gr.)
The inscriptions read 'To Major General Johnson A grateful Tribute for Signal Services effected by his Gallantry and Spirit for his Native Country and the British Empire in the Battle of New Ross 5th June 1798 and 'From a Body of Gentlemen assembled on the 5th June 1799 in the City of Waterford to commemorate the Glorious Æra of National Deliverance' (2)
Provenance
Presented to Major General Sir Henry Johnson, 1st Bt. (1748-1835), on 5 June 1799 by a body of gentlemen of Waterford and by descent to
Brigadier General Sutleng Johnson Bt.
Brigadier General Sutleng Johnson Bt; Christie's, London, 3 November 1954, lot 140 (£400 to Davidson).

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Tom Johans

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Lot Essay

Sir Henry Johnson 1st Bt. (1748-1835)

Johnson was born in 1748, the second son Allen Johnson (d. 1747) of Kilternan, co. Dublin and his wife, Olivia, the daughter of John Walsh of Ballykilcavan, Queen's county. Having entered the army in 1761, Johnson rose through the ranks to become Major-General by 1793 and General in 1808. He was wounded and made a prisoner while in command of a battalion of Irish light infantry during the American Revolutionary War.

He married, in 1782, Rebecca Franks, returning to England after the capture of Yorktown. By 1798 he was sent to County Wexford, ending up overseeing the defence of New Ross in June that year. It seemed initially that Johnson and his troops would be defeated, having been driven from the town during a siege that morning but Johnson was able to recapture the town. Of his bravery Lord Cornwallis said "Johnson, although a wrong-headed blockhead, is adored for his defence at New Ross, and considered as the saviour of the south."

He was created a baronet in 1818 and died at his home in Bath in 1835, being succeeded in the baronetcy by his son.

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