Emma Sandys (1834-1877)
THE PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Emma Sandys (1834-1877)

Portrait of Mary Emma Jones, bust-length, wearing a pearl necklace

Details
Emma Sandys (1834-1877)
Portrait of Mary Emma Jones, bust-length, wearing a pearl necklace
signed with monogram and dated '1874' (upper left)
oil on board
20 x 15 ¼ in. (50.8 x 38.8 cm.)

Brought to you by

Clare Keiller
Clare Keiller

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Emma Sandys was the sister of Frederick Sandys (1829-1904), whose luscious portraits in the Rossettian mould served as inspiration to his younger sibling. Although Emma's work is similar in style and in the strength of its design, she established herself on her own professional terms, exhibiting at the Royal Academy, The Society of Lady Artists, and various Norwich galleries, thereby attracting patrons from amongst the local aristocracy. While images of women predominate in Pre-Raphaelite paintings, the wider artistic circle included many talented female artists, such as Emma, Elizabeth Siddal, Marie Stillman and Evelyn de Morgan, each of whom sustained successful artistic careers.

Recently rediscovered, the present lot depicts Mary Emma Jones, Emma's sister-in-law, who modelled for many of Frederick's works including Perdita (Lloyd Webber Collection) and Proud Maisie (Victoria & Albert Museum). The oil painting appears to be based on a chalk drawing by Frederick from circa 1873, now in the Birmingham City Art Museum (see B. Elzea, Frederick Sandys (1829-1904), p. 249, no. 3.48) One of the characteristics of the oeuvre of the Sandys siblings was the sharing and repetition of models, studio props and costumes, as well as a similarity in technique which has often led to confusion over attribution between the siblings. Portrait of Mary Emma Jones bears all the hallmarks of Emma's mature style, and shows the level of sophistication the genre achieved during the 1860s and 1870s.

We are grateful to Betty Elzea, author of the monograph on Frederick Sandys, for confirming the attribution of the present lot.
;

More from Victorian Pre-Raphaelite & British Impressionist Art

View All
View All