Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A RARE AND UNUSUAL DOUCAI MOON FLASK
A RARE AND UNUSUAL DOUCAI MOON FLASK
A RARE AND UNUSUAL DOUCAI MOON FLASK
2 More
Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more PROPERTY FROM A NEW ENGLAND COLLECTION
A RARE AND UNUSUAL DOUCAI MOON FLASK

18TH CENTURY

Details
A RARE AND UNUSUAL DOUCAI MOON FLASK
18TH CENTURY
The flattened form flask is surmounted by a tall neck and flanked by a pair of thin, wide handles decorated with three dots. The body is decorated on either side with branches of peaches, finger citrons and lychees, all between stylized lappet borders.
12¼ in. (31.2 cm.) high, hardwood stand
Provenance
Probably acquired in Berlin or Amsterdam in the late 19th century, and thence by descent to the present owner, prior to 1959.
Special Notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

Brought to you by

Vicki Paloympis (潘薇琦)
Vicki Paloympis (潘薇琦) Vice President, Specialist, Head of Sale

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition Report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay


The shape of this vase is based on Ming dynasty prototypes of early fifteenth century date. A Ming example of the same height, but with a narrower neck and different handles, is illustrated by R. Scott in Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art: A Guide to the Collection, London, 1989, p. 73, no. 61, where the author notes that this shape has its origins in Syrian glass. However, the decoration on the present vase is purely Chinese. The three fruiting branches seen here represent the sanduo (Three Abundances), comprised of the citron (abundance of blessings), the peach (abundance of longevity) and the lychee (abundance of sons). The citron, pronounced foshou in Chinese, is similar in its first character (fo) to fu, which means 'blessings'. Peaches are symbols of longevity, and the second character for lychee, zhi, resembles the word for 'sons'.

Several other eighteenth century moon flasks of similar form are known. See a larger Yongzheng-marked example (36.5 cm.), decorated with birds on blossoming prunus branches, illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum - Blue and White Porcelain with Underglaze Red (III), Hong Kong, 2000, p. 111, no. 97. Compare, also, the smaller (29.2 cm.) Yongzheng-marked blue and white moon flask sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 29 April 2001, lot 566, and another smaller (18.2 cm.) related blue and white moon flask, also sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 27 May 2008, lot 1828.

More from Important Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

View All
View All