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A ROMAN MARBLE ARTEMIS OF EPHESUS
A ROMAN MARBLE ARTEMIS OF EPHESUS
A ROMAN MARBLE ARTEMIS OF EPHESUS
A ROMAN MARBLE ARTEMIS OF EPHESUS
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A ROMAN MARBLE FRAGMENTARY HEAD OF JUBA II

CIRCA 15-5 B.C.

Details
A ROMAN MARBLE FRAGMENTARY HEAD OF JUBA II
CIRCA 15-5 B.C.
12 in. (30.5 cm.) high
Provenance
French private collection since 1951.
Douce family collection, Paris and Château de Sauveboeuf, acquired from the above in the 1970s, thence by descent.

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Claudio Corsi
Claudio Corsi Specialist

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Lot Essay

Juba II (52/50 B.C.- 23 A.D.) was a Berber prince from North Africa, who later became king of Numidia and Mauretania. He was the son of King Juba I, who had taken his own life, rather than see his kingdom become a province of the Roman empire, after being defeated by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C. A small boy of no more that 4-6 years old at that time, he had been taken hostage, brought to Rome and paraded as part of Caesar’s triumphal procession.
However once in Rome he became an educated young man, learned Latin and Greek and was granted Roman citizenship. He was raised by Julius Caesar and later by his great-nephew Octavian (Emperor Augustus). He accompanied his life-long friend Octavian on military campaigns, and fought alongside him in the battle of Actium in 31 BC. Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia in 25 BC, and arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II, the twin daughter of Mark Anthony and Cleopatra, who had herself been brought to Rome after the deaths of her famous parents.
For a detailed discussion of Juba portraits, their chronology and changing physiognomy see C. Landwehr, 'Les portraits de Juba II, roi de Maurétanie, et de Ptolémée, son fils et successeur', Revue archéologique, 2007/1, no. 43, pp 65-110. Taking Landwehr's dating of the known portraits, the present example with the fleshier cheeks, would suggest a portrait of Juba in his middle years. Throughout his reign his portraits remained consistant, shedding the Numibian heritage and portraying himself very much as the educated Hellenistic and Ptolemaic ruler - beardless and with a fillet tied in his hair.





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